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Using Wikis and Collaborations in Canvas

Using the Wikis in Canvas

All Canvas' "Pages" are actually "Wiki Pages"

This guide will help you use Canvas' features to put a Wiki in your course. Some faculty have been using Campus Pack's Wiki feature for this. You can use this method while we're perfecting the CampusPack integration with Canvas-- you might just like it better!

Features of a Wiki

  • Collaborative: Multiple users (such as teachers, students, and project groups) can edit the same shared collaboration page.
  • Rich text and media: Wikis allow you to post text, images, videos, and other web content for your collaborators to view
  • Revision History: Wikis save all previous copies of the document so you can look back to previous saves. This means nobody can really "erase" the document

Canvas' "Pages" tool is actually a Wiki that only teachers can write on by default-- but it doesn't have to be this way...

All Canvas' "Pages" are actually "Wiki Pages"

"Teachers AND Students can Edit This Page"

By changing this setting to "Teacher and Students" or "Anyone", you can turn this page into a collaborative document for the whole class. [Learn more here] This is great when you want all students to be able to see and interact with the wiki. Similarly, selecting "Anyone can edit this page" enables non-SMU course participants like guest speakers to interact with the wiki.

For more focused groupwork, Canvas' Groups feature gives project groups their own private wikis that can only be viewed and edited by group members. [Learn more here]

"Teachers AND Students can Edit This Page"

Other Collaborations in Canvas

In addition to the Wiki Pages, Canvas also offers the "Collaborations" tools. These provide wiki-like functionality with unique differences:

Google Docs: Students and Faculty who have connected their Google Docs accounts to Canvas can create collaborative Google Docs with class members. Google Docs offers many different types of collaborative documents including spreadsheets, presentations, and word processing.

EtherPad: EtherPad is another collaboration that students or faculty can put in place. The benefit of EtherPad over other collaboration types is that it's public, anonymous, and very quick to get started. Just set up an EtherPad collaboration and students will be able to contribute instantly.

Other Collaborations in Canvas