Course Descriptions

IPE 101 (Undergraduate), IPE 601 (Master’s), IPE 701 (Doctoral)Interprofessional Student Hotspotting (2 Units)

Interprofessional Student Hotspotting is an annual longitudinal program co-hosted by the Camden Coalition’s National Center for Complex Health and Social Needs, the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), Primary Care Progress, National Academies of Practice (NAP), Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) and American Association of Colleges of Nursing. As one of the four national “Hotspotting Hubs,” SMU offers this elective course to provide students with the opportunity to work on interprofessional teams to learn about the root causes of high healthcare utilization, and share this learning with their peers. Curricular elements include a ~3-hour virtual kickoff event, an online asynchronous curriculum, ~biweekly virtual skills labs and case conferences (which will include virtual simulated encounters with individuals who have complex health and social needs), and a ~3-hour virtual wrap-up event. 

Lower Division (Courses numbered 1-99)

BSCI 015/016 Human Anatomy (4 units)

This is an integrated lecture and laboratory course designed to familiarize the student with the clinically relevant aspects of human anatomy and the language of health sciences. The topics of the integumentary, circulatory, musculoskeletal, nervous and all major organ systems will be covered in both laboratory and lecture settings. Pre-dissected cadavers and other anatomical materials allow the student to reinforce the lecture material and to explore the spatial relationships between structures within systems and distinct anatomical regions. (3 units lecture, 1 unit lab)

BSCI 025/026 Introduction to Human Physiology (4 units)

The Introduction to Human Physiology Lecture (BSCI 025) and Lab (BSCI 026) are on-campus, introductory courses designed to fulfill requirements for health sciences degree programs. The lecture course introduces basic principles of physiology, highlighting homeostatic control mechanisms, through the study of the principal organ systems of the human body. These systems include the nervous, muscular, cardiovascular, respiratory, urinary, digestive, endocrine, reproductive, and immune systems. Additional topics explored include relevant concepts in molecular and cell biology, select signaling mechanisms, and associated pathophysiology. The laboratory course is designed to enhance learning of physiological concepts through problem-solving and hands-on experiments. Lab exercises use a data acquisition and analysis system as well as wet-lab experiments. (3 units lecture, 1 unit lab)

Upper Division (Courses numbered 100-199)

GENED 101 Foundations of Death, Dying and Bereavement (3 units)

This general education course will provide a broad, interdisciplinary introduction to the essential topics and core knowledge – both classical and contemporary – that underlie death-related counseling and education. It will provide a basis for the student’s personal growth and responsible social participation. It is intended to enhance the students’ awareness of their life goals and priorities. Further the course will contribute to the education of those who through their professional career choice will be closely associated with people who are in the dying process. There will be an emphasis on developing cultural sensitivity related to the topics discussed. The students will examine and assess the following topics: infant deaths, childhood deaths, suicide, homicide, end-of-life legal issues, ethical issues, the funeral industry, bereavement and family considerations.

GENED 102 Drugs and Society (3 units)

This general education course will provide a broad, interdisciplinary introduction to the abuse of drugs in the society. The intent is to help students from a variety of disciplines develop a realistic perspective of drug-related problems. It will provide current information and perspectives on the following critical issues: social and psychological reasons why drug use and abuse occurs; the results of drug use and abuse; how to prevent drug use and abuse. The most current information on drug abuse research, policy making and implementation will be discussed.

GENED 104 The Global Implications of Genetics and Genomics (3 units)

Advances in genetic and genomic health present both incredible opportunities and significant challenges for healthcare practitioners and society in general. Application of new research discoveries in this area compel individuals to address ethical, legal and social implications (ELSI) as well as health policy concerns for the consumer, the practitioner and those involved in healthcare delivery and allocation of resources. This course will employ lecture, discussion, group discussion, multimedia presentation and written and oral application to explore these issues related to genetics and genomics. Content includes evaluation of knowledge and attitudes about genetics and genomics; educational interventions to enhance genetic literacy; ethical, legal, social and policy issues related to genetics and genomics and emerging technologies (such as direct to consumer marketing of genetic tests, pharmacogenomics and epigenetics). The course content will be enriched by incorporating popular press and media in application assignments.

GENED 105 Compassion in Art and Literature (3 units)

This course explores compassion as theme in a variety of art and literary works. Differentiation between concepts of compassion, empathy, and sympathy will be examined. Students will engage in analysis of techniques used by writers, poets, playwrights, filmmakers, and others who seek to engender compassion from readers and viewers. Students are invited to reflect upon their own reactions to works presented, and will independently and collectively seek art and literature to analyze and present.

NURSG 108 Nursing Research: Using Best Practices and Evidence to Improve Clinical Outcomes (2 units)

This course is designed to introduce nursing research and evidence-based practice as it relates to achieving clinical outcomes. The student will learn to use nursing research and the collection of evidence as a systematic process to inform practice and make clinical judgments. Students will learn to critically analyze research and understand how to utilize findings for evidence based practice. ABSN Prerequisites: NURSG 128; NURSG 136. BSN Prerequisite: NURSG 137.

NURSG 111 Pathopharmacology for Nursing Practice I (3 units)

This course introduces the student to essential concepts in pathophysiology among diverse populations across the lifespan and general principles of pharmacology and medication administration for nursing practice. The course explores the relationship between these two foundational sciences to the science of nursing, placing emphasis on the mechanisms by which disease occurs and/or body systems fail and the pharmacological management, as well as other interventions, to address the disease process. Prerequisites: Anatomy, Physiology and Microbiology.

NURSG 112 Pathopharmacology for Nursing Practice II (3 units)

This course integrates general principles of pharmacology with pathophysiological phenomena among diverse populations across the lifespan. This course builds upon previous knowledge of pathophysiology and pharmacology. A continued emphasis is placed on the mechanisms by which disease occurs and/or body systems fail, and the pharmacological management, as well as other interventions to address complex disease processes. Prerequisites: NURSG 111

NURSG 118 Pharmacology (3 units)

This course introduces the student to essential concepts in pharmacology for nursing practice. The course will focus on drug administration, legal issues, the major pharmacologic drug classes, practical information used in assessing patient response, medication side effects, and key patient education components. Offered online only.

NURSG 119 Pathophysiology (3 units)

In this course the student explores the continuum of health from wellness to death. Emphasis is placed on the mechanisms by which disease occurs and/or body systems fail. Students will examine pathophysiologic phenomena occurring in diverse populations across the lifespan. Prerequisites: Physiology, and Microbiology. Offered online only.

NURSG 120/120L Managing Care of the Adults I and Clinical Integration Seminar (5 units)

Building upon the learner’s previous knowledge, this course utilizes the nursing process to integrate theory with practice in promoting an individual's achievement of optimal health. Particular emphasis is placed upon the concept of wholeness, referring to the constant interactions of an individual’s biological, emotional, sociocultural, spiritual, and environmental dimensions. Students will expand their knowledge of core competencies such as critical thinking, effective communication, ethics, diversity, professionalism, leadership, information management and an appreciation for the global environment in which health care is provided. The students will develop nursing psychomotor skills to provide competent and safe care in a variety of settings. Prerequisites: NURSG 138; NURSG 125/NURSG125L. (2 units theory, 3 units clinical)

NURSG 125/125L Health Assessment I (2.5-4 units)

Using principles of effective communication and the concepts of nursing, environment, person, and health, the student develops skills in performing health assessment of well individuals throughout the lifespan from infancy to older adults. The course introduces the student to the nursing process, communication and interviewing techniques, health assessment, data collection for the nursing history, and accurate and concise documentation of findings. Prerequisite: Admission to the ABSN or BSN program (BSN: 3 units lecture, 1 unit lab; ABSN: 1.5 units lecture, 1.0 unit lab)

NURSG 126/126L Health Assessment II (2.5 units)

Introducing principles of health promotion and health teaching and building upon principles of basic health assessment, the students will continue to develop health assessment techniques on individuals within a continuum of healthcare settings. Assessment also includes understanding the family, community, or population and utilizing data from organizations and systems in planning and delivering care. Pre-requisites: NURSG 125/NURSG 125L, NURSG 138 (1.5 units lecture, 1.0 unit lab)

NURSG 127/127L Managing Care of the Adults I-II (10 units)

This course focuses upon both caring for and caring about the adult client. Building upon the learner’s previous knowledge, the course utilizes the nursing process in providing opportunity to integrate theory with a focus on nursing interventions directed towards protection, promotion, maintenance, and restoration of the health of patients and their human responses to both chronic and acute illness. Particular emphasis is placed upon the concept of wholeness, referring to the constant interactions of an individual’s biophysical, emotional, socio-cultural, spiritual, and environmental dimensions. By applying the Nursing Process, the baccalaureate prepared student nurse continues to distinguish the health care needs of the adult patient within the context of the family constellation and the community. Theory content for this nursing course addresses selected areas of health alterations that beginning and intermediate nursing student will likely encounter in the clinical setting. The course content is designed to assist the learner in knowledge development of core competencies such as critical thinking, effective communication, ethics, diversity, professionalism, leadership, information management, and an appreciation for the global environment in which health care is provided. Prerequisites: NURSG 137; NURSG 111, ; NURSG 125/NURSG125L, NURSG 129. Corequisites: NURSG 112, NURSG 128.

NURSG 128 - Healthy Aging (2 units)

This course builds on prior learning experiences to facilitate caring for the older adult client. This course introduces students to the biopsychosocial, cultural, ethnogeriatric, and political concepts of aging. The student applies knowledge of the nursing process, human development, theories of aging, evidence based practice and environmental factors to promote the client’s achievement of an optimal level of health and functioning across a continuum of health care settings. ABSN Prerequisites: NURSG 120; NURSG 126/NURSG 126L. Must be taken concurrently with NURSG 136.  BSN Prerequisites: NURSG 111, NURSG 125/NURSG 125L, NURSG 129, NURSG 137. Must be taken concurrently with NURSG 112, NURSG 127.

NURSG 129/129L Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursing (5 units)

This course focuses on the application of psychiatric/mental health nursing concepts to the care of individuals, families, groups and communities. Within a therapeutic, interactive relationship the student assesses the client’s mental health needs. Emphasis is placed on the application of concepts of communication. Theories of mental health will be explored. These theories are selectively integrated with concepts of mental health nursing in the care of clients in a variety of settings from the most restrictive to the least restrictive. Intensive experience will be offered in one clinical setting and in various community settings. Prerequisite: Admission to the BSN program. (2 units lecture, 3 units clinical)

NURSG 136/136L Managing Care of Adults II and Clinical Integration Seminar (5 units)

The course builds on prior knowledge and learning experiences of the students. It focuses on nursing interventions directed towards, protection, promotion, maintenance, and restoration of the health of patients and their human responses to both acute and chronic illness. Through application of the Nursing Process, the baccalaureate prepared student nurse continues to distinguish the health care needs of the adult patient within the context of the family constellation and the community. ABSN Prerequisites: NURSG 120; NURSG126/NURSG 126L.  Must be taken concurrently with NURSG 128. (2 units lecture, 3 units clinical)

NURSG 137 Introduction to Professional Nursing (3 units)

This course is an introduction to the role of the professional Registered Nurse, and the concepts of person, health, and environment. Students will consider aspects of professional practice including legal scope of practice, concepts of decision making, evidence-base for practice; and transfer of knowledge. The student will develop a beginning appreciation of how culture influences the expectations of persons and their rights and responsibilities in the healthcare system. This course introduces students to critical thinking and bioethics, and provides opportunity to examine the ethical issues facing professional nurses and the health care delivery system. Prerequisite: Admission to the BSN program.

NURSG 138 Introduction to Professional Nursing and the Health Care Delivery System (2 units)

Introduction to the health care system, nursing as a profession, and the concepts of health, illness and environment. Cultural sensitivity, patient’s rights and responsibilities, critical thinking, and ethical foundations are discussed. Students examine nursing history, paradigm, ethical cases, nursing as a caring science, holistic and allopathic approaches to healing, and values and ethical decision making models. Prerequisite: Admission to the ABSN program.

NURSG 144/144L Care of the Childbearing Family (5 units)

Students examine and practice the nursing role with diverse families in all phases of the childbearing process with an emphasis on the changes occurring in the biological, personal and social systems. The health needs of the childbearing family are studied from the perspective of the concepts of health promotion and disease prevention. Clinical experiences are provided in hospital and community settings. ABSN Prerequisite: NURSG 136. BSN Prerequisite: NURSG 127 (2 units lecture, 3 units clinical)

NURSG 158/158L Nursing Care of Infants, Children and Youth Populations (5 units)

Exploring the concepts of health and human development, and using the nursing process, students apply the nursing role in providing care to children from birth to young adulthood and to their families. Children's health problems are examined within the context of family, social and community systems, and interdisciplinary health care systems in primary, secondary, and tertiary care. Developmental differences in response to health promotion, screening and acute and chronic illnesses in community agencies and hospitals are emphasized. Students will provide nursing care to children and youth in a variety of healthcare settings. ABSN Prerequisites NURSG 136.  BSN Prerequisites: NURSG 127. (2 units lecture, 3 units clinical)

NURSG 160 Nursing Leadership, Management, and Health Policy (3 units)

This course is designed to assist students to explore management and leadership issues as they assume the professional role of registered nurse in a complex health care environment. Content focuses on organizational and systems leadership, quality improvement and safety while providing integrated, cost-effective care to clients by coordinating, supervising, and/or collaborating with members of the multidisciplinary health care team. The role of the professional nurse as a leader and change agent shaping policy at the unit, organizational, local, state, and national levels is explored. The nature of politics of the work unit and the health care organization and role in advocating for improvements in patient care and nursing practice are analyzed. Students will have the opportunity to apply leadership and management theories and concepts to practice in the Senior Synthesis (NURSG 181/190L) course. Course must be taken concurrently with NURSG 181 or NURSG 190L. ABSN Prerequisites: NURSG 129, NURSG 170. BSN Prerequisites: NURSG 144, NURSG 158, NURSG 164, NURSG 170.

NURSG 164/164L Managing Care of Adults III and Clinical Integration Seminar (5 units)

This course builds on prior learning experiences to develop knowledge and skills used to facilitate culturally competent, holistic, patient-centered care for adults experiencing complex health variations. The integration of basic with advanced knowledge in pathophysiology, pharmacology, communication concepts, and therapeutic interventions provides the foundation for the provision of safe, effective, evidence-based professional nursing care. Students will become increasingly competent in the application of nursing process, problem-solving and critical thinking as they provide nursing care based on evidence that contributes to safe and high quality patient outcomes within healthcare micro-systems. ABSN Prerequisites: NURSG 128; NURSG 136. BSN Prerequisites: NURSG 127. (2 units lecture; 3 units clinical)

NURSG 170/170L Community Health Nursing (5 units)

Community health nursing is a synthesis of the practice of two disciplines: Nursing and public health. This course focuses on the promotion and maintenance of the health of aggregates with the community as client, and uses principles, concepts, and theories from nursing and public health to promote the special needs of vulnerable populations across the lifespan. ABSN Prerequisites: NURSG 108; NURSG 144, NURSG 158, NURSG 164. BSN Prerequisites: NURSG 144, NURSG 158, NURSG 164. (2 units lecture, 3 units clinical)

NURSG 181L Senior Synthesis (3 units)

This course is designed to assist the learner in using critical thinking, ethical reasoning and clinical judgment in synthesizing nursing theory/knowledge and nursing therapeutics into nursing practice. The learner will have an opportunity to focus on a selected area of nursing practice while providing quality care which maintains the safety of the patient. Through the use of the nursing process, the learner will provide culturally sensitive nursing care to diverse clients. This care will be increasingly self-directed, independent, creative and based on evidence. The learner will apply leadership and management principles to the clinical practice setting to further develop his/her understanding of the professional nursing role. Prerequisites: NURSG 129; NURSG 170. Must be taken concurrently with NURSG 160.

NURSG 190L Senior Synthesis (6 units)

This course assists the student in synthesizing nursing theory, knowledge and nursing therapeutics in his/her selected area of clinical practice. The student will provide nursing care that is increasingly self-directed and independent. Application of leadership and management principles will also be incorporated in the clinical setting. Prerequisites: NURSG 144, NURSG 158, NURSG 164, NURSG 170 (must be taken concurrently with NURSG 160). (6 clinical units)

NURSG 191L Nursing Work Study (1-4 units)

The work-study option provides the student with an opportunity for guided clinical practice of previously acquired nursing theory and skills in a variety of clinical settings. Working under the direct supervision of an RN preceptor employed by the clinical agency, the student plans, implements, and evaluates nursing care for a selected group of clients. The student works closely with the preceptor and a faculty representative to meet individualized learning objectives. Prerequisite: senior standing (1-4 units clinical)

NURSG 192 International Nursing Elective (4 units)

A course focusing on nursing and health care in the global environment. Content and learning experience may relate to the study of nursing and health care in one or more communities/countries outside the continental USA. Clinical experiences are designed to increase the student’s knowledge of aggregate health care and nursing problems in foreign countries and to improve the student’s ability to provide care to diverse clients in these settings. Prerequisite: senior standing

RN to BSN Courses

GENED 400 MBSR & the Neuroscience of Change (3 units)

The central focus of this course is training in Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR). The neuroscience of change, unitary caring science, and reflective practice are introduced. Informed by a mind/body practice and an in-depth personal exploration of meditative awareness in everyday life, the place of the meditative mind in professional practice is explored. Scholars develop their capacity for awareness, cultivation and application of intrinsic qualities in their personal and professional relationships. These qualities include non-judgement, concentration, openness, flexibility, equanimity, wisdom, warmth, and compassion for self and others and lead to a deeper appreciation of interdependence and connectedness in our daily lives. Scholars learn to use MBSR, reflective practice and the neuroscience of change to support therapeutic presence and create safer healing and work environments. This is a blended course with required face-to-face and online components.

GENED 435 Applied Research & Statistics I (3 unit)

This course is the first in a two-part series for understanding research findings. Descriptive, inferential, and non-parametric statistical tests are introduced. Scholars learn to interpret common statistical results to evaluate research findings. Scholars learn computerized literature search processes and read quantitative research. The course focuses on identifying relationships between research questions, statistical analyses, and research findings. This is a blended course with required face-to-face and online components.

GENED 436 Applied Research & Statistics II (2 unit)

This course is the second in a two-part series for understanding research findings. Scholars are introduced to evidence-based practice, hierarchies of evidence, qualitative research, and the PICOT format for clinical questions. Scholars conduct computerized searches for evidence, read qualitative and quantitative research, and summarize findings that address questions related to the discipline and practice of nursing. This is a blended course with both online and face-to-face components. Prerequisite: GEN ED 435 Applied Research & Statistics I

GENED 444 Health Policy (2 units)

This course explores the historical, political, and economic forces that shape health care systems in the US and across the globe. Social values and mechanisms for reimbursing health services are investigated. Research findings on access to health care, quality of healthcare, and costs are compared. Scholars read about health policy across the political spectrum to contextualize and develop their own values and positions, paying particular attention to research on access, costs, and aggregate population outcomes. This is a blended course with required face-to-face and online components.

NURSG 452 Caring Science I (2 units)

The first course in this two-part caring science series focuses on the integration of pathophysiological and pharmacological knowledge to address conditions commonly encountered in the continuum of care. Scholars learn patient centered care and best practices using a unitary caring science approach. This is a blended course with required face-to-face and online components. Prerequisite: GENED 400 MBSR & the Neuroscience of Change

NURSG 454 Caring Science II (2 units)

The second course in this two- part caring science series focuses on complex and multisystem dysfunction encountered in the continuum of care. Scholars apply patient centered care and best practices using a unitary caring science approach. This is a blended course with required face-to-face and online components. Prerequisite: NURSG 452 Caring Science II

GENED 456 Genetics & Genomics (2 units)

Scholars evaluate knowledge and attitudes about genetics and genomics; explore educational interventions that enhance literacy in genetics and pedigree analysis; examine the risks and benefits of genetic testing; and discuss the ethical, legal, social, and privacy issues related to emerging technologies such as direct-to-consumer marketing of genetic tests, and pharmacogenomics. Scholars will be introduced to the concept of epigenetics. Related ethical, legal, and social implications that affect resource allocation and health policy are discussed. This is a blended course with online and face-to-face components.

NURSG 460 Quality, Safety & Leadership I (2 units)

The chief purpose of leadership in the healthcare industry is to ensure safe, quality patient care. The first course in this four-part series focuses on self-knowledge, ethics, and informatics. Students complete a variety of instruments to identify preferences and develop communication and teamwork skills, especially with those who have markedly different preferences. Using the American Nurses’ Association Code of Ethics for Nurses as a framework, students explore professional challenges associated with meeting the four key components of the professional nursing role: clinician/ practitioner, teacher-learner, leader, and scientist. The informatics component focuses on emerging technologies used to record, retrieve, and critically analyze clinical data to improve nursing care. This is a blended course with required face-to-face and online components.

NURSG 464 Quality, Safety, and Leadership II (2 units)

The chief purpose of leadership in the healthcare industry is to ensure safe, quality patient care. The second course in this four-part series focuses on organizational missions, cultures of safety, models of change, aggregate outcomes. Scholars identify datasets used to evaluate practice against standards, identify a local quality or safety problem, and begin their e-portfolio. This is a blended course with required face-to-face and online components. Prerequisite: NURSG 460 Quality, Safety & Leadership I and NURSG 436, Applied Research & Statistics II

NURSG 466 Quality, Safety, and Leadership III (2 units)

The chief purpose of leadership in the healthcare industry is to ensure safe quality care. The third course in this four-part series focuses on local, national, and international patient safety goals and improvement initiatives. Regulatory agencies are discussed. Scholars investigate organizational cultures and inter-professional teamwork strategies to lead change and support healthy work environments. This is a blended course with both face-to-face and online components. Prerequisite: NURSG 464 Quality, Safety & Leadership II

NURSG 468 Quality, Safety, and Leadership IV (2 units)

The chief purpose of leadership in the healthcare industry is to promote healthy work environments that deliver safe, quality patient care. The final course in this four-part series focuses on developing the knowledge, skills and attitudes to transform healthcare delivery in the United States. Scholars finalize practice improvement projects, share them with clinical partners, and design a project evaluation. This is a blended course with required face-to-face and online components.

NURSG 475/475L Community/Public Health Nursing (4 units)

This course explores the concept of community as client and the unique practice characteristics of public health nursing (PHN) in the context of unitary caring science. The nursing process is used to guide public health nursing practice. Scholars differentiate between levels of prevention and explore ways to increase resilience and prevent disease. Scholars analyze social and structural determinants of health and utilize epidemiological evidence to guide community and public health nursing practice. Scholars learn about the impact of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) on health. This course meets the BRN didactic requirements for a PHN certificate, including mandated reporting. This is a blended course with required face-to-face and online components. This practicum explores community as client and the unique practice characteristics of public health nursing (PHN) in the context of unitary caring science. Scholars develop relationships and cultivate partnerships to complete a comprehensive assessment of a community. Scholars apply the nursing process in the design and delivery of intervention(s) to improve the health of a community. Scholars evaluate their work and make evidence-based recommendations. This practicum meets BRN eligibility requirements for the PHN certificate. This is a face-to-face course. 2 unit lecture, 2 unit lab

GENED 490 Humanities and the Human Condition (2 units)

This course explores how life, especially birth, suffering, caring, and death are shaped in art- primarily novels, films, and plays. Historical and cultural roles of caring for the sick and caring for souls are considered. Scholars will discuss how art and the humanities help people understand themselves and their worlds. Scholars will explore films and works of art that may arouse a wide spectrum of emotional responses and challenge personal values and beliefs about people, behaviors, and situations. This is a blended course with required face-to-face and online components.

Graduate Courses (Lab courses denoted with an L.)

NURSG 500 Transition to Professional Role of Nursing (2 units)

This course is an introduction to the healthcare system, concepts of person, nursing, health, illness, and environment. Using a model of professional practice, history, and transition theory, the student develops a beginning knowledge of the RN role in contemporary society. Concepts of caring, ethics, the influence of culture on health, and wellness, and critical thinking techniques pertinent to the professional nurse will be explored. This course will also explore the history of nursing and how it shapes nursing as a scholarly discipline that defines practice. The focus of the historical review will be on how history continues to influence the future of nursing.

NURSG 520 Integration of Basic Principles of Pathophysiology and Pharmacology (5 units)

This course introduces and integrates general principles of pharmacology and pathophysiological phenomena. It explores the relationship of these two foundational sciences to the science of nursing. Placing emphasis on the mechanisms by which disease occurs and/or body systems fail and the nursing and pharmacological management of the disease process. Using the foundation of professional role and the process of clinical reasoning to make a decision, the RN’s role in medical management and decision-making is explored.

NURSG 524/524L Health Assessment (3 units)

Using principles of effective communication and the concepts of nursing, environment, person, and health, the student develops skills in performing health assessment of well individuals throughout the lifespan from infancy to older adults. The course introduces the student to the nursing process, communication and interviewing techniques, health assessment, data collection for the nursing history, and accurate and concise documentation of findings.

NURSG 534/534L Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursing (5 units)

This course focuses on the application of psychiatric/mental health nursing concepts to the care of individuals, families, groups and communities. Within a therapeutic, interactive relationship, the student assesses the patient’s and family’s mental health needs and works with them to develop a plan that supports their desired health outcomes. Emphasis is placed on the application of concepts of communication and its use in shaping the individuals/families narrative as it relates to their health needs. Current theories of mental illness and treatment will be explored. Utilizing the individual/family narrative, theories are then selectively integrated into mental health nursing care. A variety of patient care settings are selected during the clinical portion in order to provide an opportunity for the student to relate theory to practice. The initial five weeks of clinical will be utilized to introduce the student to various communication approaches in order to help the student develop the basic skills needed to effectively communicate in a variety of settings. Therapeutic communication, motivational interviewing, lateral violence and professional communication, de-escalation and group will be central concepts in this portion of the course. (2 units lecture, 3 units clinical)

NURSG 540/540L Reproductive Health Care (5 units)

Students examine and practice the nursing role with diverse families in all phases of the childbearing process with an emphasis on the changes occurring in the biological, personal and social systems. The health needs of the childbearing family are studied from the perspective of the concepts of health promotion and disease prevention. Clinical experiences are provided in hospital and community settings. Prerequisites: NURSG 520; NURSG 524/524L; NURSG 534/534L; NURSG 542L; NURSG 543L; NURSG 546/546L (2 units lecture, 3 units clinical)

NURSG 542L and NURSG 543L Nursing Skills I and II (1 unit each)

The courses NURSG 542 and NURSG 543 provide the student with theory and practice of skills inherent in the professional nursing role. The student will learn to make informed decisions by utilizing inquiry, information technology and analysis in the application of evidence based nursing and clinical reasoning. Incorporating the concepts learned from the sciences into the nursing process, the student is accountable for demonstrating beginning competence with the following: medication administration via a variety of routes, dosage calculation, maintenance of a safe and hygienic environment, attention to correctly and safely mobilizing clients, assessment and management of acute pain, dressings and wound care, promoting gastrointestinal function, intubation and maintenance, oral and enteral feeding measures, capillary blood glucose monitoring, urinary catheterization and care. Skills acquisition is presented within the context of the professional nursing role with the student held accountable for demonstrating comprehension of basic principles of teaching/learning, nursing documentation and medical and surgical asepsis.  NURSG 542L must be taken concurrently with NURSG 524L. NURSG 543L has NURSG 524, NURSG 524L, and NURSG 542L as prerequisite.

NURSG 546/546L Nursing Care of Adults and Older Adults (10 units)

This course builds on previous course work to promote nursing care for adults and older adults within an interdisciplinary team. The focus is on health promotion, disease prevention, maintenance and restoration of health in individuals who are healthy and those responding to acute and chronic illness across the lifespan. The student applies knowledge of the nursing process, human development and environmental factors to provide care to adults and older adults within a family support network. The student continues in building their knowledge about the professional role of RNs, exploring leadership, outcome management, and decision making in diverse population of the acutely ill hospitalized patient. Prerequisites: NURSG 520; NURSG 524/524L; NURSG 534/534L; NURSG 542L (4 units lecture, 6 units clinical)

NURSG 550 Nurses as Consumers of Research (2 units)

This course is designed to enhance student understanding of different types of research. By building on the concepts of and utilizing tools of critical thinking, students will read a variety of research articles from selected disciplines. Nurse and other theorists will be explored in their relation to their contribution to research. The focus of the course is on developing an appreciation for research as a foundation for evidence based practice. By the end of this course, the student will have gained a deeper understanding of the integration among research, theory, evidence, and practice. This course lays foundational work for their graduate level research course. Co-requisites: NURSG 546-546L, NURSG 562

NURSG 556/556L Nursing Care of Pediatric and Youth Populations (5 units)

Exploring the concepts of health and human development, and using the nursing process, students apply the nursing role in providing care to children from birth to young adulthood and to their families. Children's health problems are examined within the context of family, social and community systems, and interdisciplinary health care systems in primary, secondary, and tertiary care. Developmental differences related to screening, health promotion, and acute and chronic illnesses in community agencies and hospitals are emphasized. Prerequisites: NURSG 520; NURSG 524/524L; NURSG 534/534L; NURSG 542L; NURSG 543L; NURSG 546/546L (2 units lecture, 3 units clinical)

NURSG 560 Leadership, Management and Organizational Behavior in Health Care Delivery Systems (3 units)

This course is designed to assist the learner in developing as a professional nurse by investigating leadership, management and organizational theories and principles. The learner studies the leadership role, communication styles, and management characteristics within health care organizations, and explores patterns of decision-making, and concepts of change and innovation. The focus is to provide the learner with knowledge of and preparation for the first leadership and management position. Prerequisites: NURSG 534/534L; NURSG 540/540L; NURSG 546/546L; NURSG 556/556L; NURSG 566/566L. NURSG 560 must be taken concurrently with NURSG 594L.

NURSG 562 Professional, Legal & Ethical Issues (3 units)

This survey course is designed to acquaint you with major professional, legal and ethical concerns within the healthcare field and the nursing profession. The course is also intended to serve as a catalyst for continuing examination of your professional status in this changing world where, despite good intentions, professional, legal and ethical problems can and do arise. Prerequisites: NURSG 500, NURSG 534/534L; NURSG 562 must be taken concurrently with NURSG 546/546L.

NURSG 566/566L Advanced Care of the Adult/Older Adult (5 units)

Care of adults with complex variations in health care patterns. Students integrate knowledge of pathophysiology, diagnostics, pharmacology, therapeutic interventions, and communication concepts as applied to the care of medical and surgical clients from a variety of ethnic backgrounds. Focus on increasing competence in the application of the nursing process, research, problem-solving, and critical thinking. A variety of health care settings will be used, including acute and critical care facilities. Prerequisites: NURSG 520; NURSG 524/524L; NURSG 534/534L; NURSG 542L; NURSG 543L; NURSG 546/546L (2 units lecture, 3 units clinical)

NURSG 570/570L Community Health Nursing (5 units)

Community Health is a synthesis of the practice of two disciplines: public health and nursing. This course focuses on the promotion and maintenance of health in selected settings with culturally diverse families and the community as the units of analysis. Prerequisites: NURSG 534/534L; NURSG 540/540L; NURSG 546/546L; NURSG 556/556L; NURSG 566/566L (2 units theory, 3 units clinical)

NURSG 594L ELMSN Advanced Clinical Placement (5 Units)

This course will assist the student in synthesizing nursing theory/knowledge and nursing therapeutics in his/her nursing practice. The student will focus on a selected area of general nursing practice. Modeling care based on the nursing process, the student will provide culturally sensitive nursing care that is increasingly self-directed, independent and creative. The student will apply leadership, professional, and management principles to the clinical practice setting to enhance understanding of the professional RN role and prepare for entry into the novice level of practice.  Prerequisite: NURSG 520, NURSG 524/524L, NURSG 540/540L, NURSG 542L, NURSG 543L, NURSG 546/546L, NURSG 556/556L, NURSG 566/566L. Corequisite: NURSG 560.

NURSG 600 Theoretical Foundations for Health Professionals (3 units)

This course will introduce the structure and functions of theory within the sciences, the humanities, and the health care disciplines. Theory development will be examined in relation to major philosophical positions on knowledge development. The interrelationship among theory, research, and practice will be explored. Examples of prototypical theories will be used to demonstrate the structure and functions of theory and applications to real world settings. Further, selected discipline-specific and common substantive theories will be discussed.

NURSG 601 Integrating Evidence into Practice (3 units)

The purpose of this course is the ethical translation of evidence into practice. Students interpret, evaluate, synthesize, and communicate research findings to improve health outcomes. Scientific writing skills are developed through summaries and syntheses of findings of clinical studies investigating therapeutic efficacy and translational studies evaluating quality improvement. Strategies and barriers to effective implementation of protocols and standards are identified and recommendations for future practice proposed.

NURSG 602 Analysis of Health Policy Issues (3 units)

This course focuses on political structures, the political process, and development of health care policy. Various theories of policy development will be emphasized. The course begins with an overview of the health care system as shaped by cultural and societal values, perceived purposes of health care, and modern technology. Attention will be given to issues of economics, finance, regulatory systems, and social justice.

NURSG 603 Epidemiology and Biostatistics (3 units)

This course presents an introduction to the principles, methods, and uses of epidemiology in determining the distribution of populations at high risk, surveillance of health status, and planning and evaluation of health services.  The course focuses on determining the relevance of the findings of epidemiological studies to clinical practice of individuals, families, and communities.

NURSG 604 Foundations of Education (3 units)

Basic educational principles, methods, and theories applied to the role of a clinical specialist. Students will be asked to examine critically their current conceptions and understandings of academic and clinical education in light of education and behavioral theories and future trends in health care, the professions, and professional education. Topics include philosophical perspectives in education, use of educational technology and tools, analysis and application of learning theories across the life span, and evaluation and assessment strategies. Synthesis Requirement The synthesis project is the final degree requirement for the MSN degree. This requirement is designed to provide the student with an opportunity to apply new knowledge and insight from graduate education in the completion of a thesis or special project. While there are various options from which a student can choose to demonstrate the Program Learning Outcomes (PLOs) objectives of the master’s degree program, all of the options include the expectation that the student will be able to effectively articulate ideas in writing, use primary and secondary library and information sources, and produce the quality of work that can withstand peer review.

Synthesis Options NURSG 605 Thesis (3 units)

A thesis is a written report of a research study conducted under the guidance of and in keeping with the expertise of a faculty member with an established research agenda. A student desiring this option should declare this intention no later than the second semester of enrollment in order to ensure that a faculty advisor is formally assigned to provide early direction on the research project. Three semester units of credit are awarded upon successful completion of the thesis.

NURSG 606 The Directed Synthesis (3 units)

The directed synthesis project is the final requirement for completion of the master's degree at Samuel Merritt University. This requirement provides the student with the opportunity to demonstrate the ability to apply the knowledge and insight gained from graduate nursing education in the completion of a special focused project in their area of advanced nursing practice. The project should reflect the student's ability to synthesize theoretical, research, and practical knowledge.

NURSG 607 Program Evaluation and Quality Improvement (3 units)

This course focuses on methodology for successful evaluation of health care programs, including comparative analysis of program purposes, cost-benefit analysis, and cost-effectiveness. A conceptual framework for quality improvement is presented and techniques for establishment of comprehensive quality improvement programs in a variety of settings are analyzed.

NURSG 608 Organizational Behavior in Health Care Delivery Systems (3 units)

This course begins with an overview of organizations, foundations and elements of organizational theory, and elements of organizational functioning in health care settings. The student studies the executive leadership role, communication, leadership and management characteristics within organizations, patterns of decision-making and concepts of change, and innovation relative to health care organizations.

NURSG 609 Health Care Economics (3 units)

This course is designed to provide a critical analysis of economic theories and public and private financing of health care. The effects of financial and reimbursement mechanisms on health care delivery systems are explored. The impact of current reimbursement patterns on nursing and professional practice, individuals, and families are discussed and critiqued.

NURSG 610 Financial Management (3 units)

This course presents the basic components of financial and management accounting as they apply to health care settings. The budget process is presented, including operating and capital budget preparation, budget management and control, and the use of variance reports. Managerial decisions are made by students based on analysis of case-study presentations.

NURSG 611 Personal Leadership Development (3 units)

This course focuses on personal leadership style and factors related to enhancing leadership effectiveness. Content covers leadership principles, visioning, creating a positive work climate, planning and implementing change, communication, working with groups using participative group process tools, and dealing with difficult people or situations. The course uses personal style assessments and outside projects to achieve personal application of concepts.

NURSG 612 Health Care Finance (3 units)

This course investigates the mechanisms by which healthcare is financed and health care providers are compensated in the United States. The effects of financing and reimbursement mechanisms on health care delivery systems, health care organizations, health care providers, and the patient are explored. Both public and private mechanisms of financing will be analyzed. The impact of current reimbursement patterns on health care delivery, professional practice, and the health care consumer are discussed and critiqued.

NURSG 613 Curriculum Design (3 units)

In this course, curriculum development in professional education is explored with emphasis on contemporary theories of and processes for various designs. Includes review of classical and current literature for planning, implementing, and assessing curricular plans. Principles can be applied to consumer and continuing education programs as well as degree programs.

NURSG 614 Methods of Teaching and Evaluation (3 units)

This course includes development, implementation, and evaluation of educational learning experiences based on adult learning theories. This course includes review of contemporary literature in the area of adult learning theory, teaching and learning methods, and assessment/evaluation methods for traditional and nontraditional education programs. Students will have the opportunity to practice a variety of teaching methods.

NURSG 615L Clinical Practicum (3 units)

Guided clinical learning experiences provided in settings with clinical specialists as preceptors. Individual arrangements may be made with clinical centers in the student’s geographic location. This course is designed to facilitate a higher level of clinical competence.

NURSG 616 Research Practicum (3 units)

This course includes supervised research experiences in an established research setting. Opportunities to participate in ongoing studies and for mentoring are provided.

NURSG 617 Teaching Practicum (3 units)

This course is designed to provide structured opportunities for students to engage in academic or clinical teaching. Individual arrangements with clinical centers and academic programs are made to facilitate the development of competence in planning, teaching, and evaluating student learning.

NURSG 618 Multicultural Health Care (3 units)

Focuses on global awareness as a conduit to providing culturally sensitive care. Cultural relativism, human diversity in the meaning of health and illness, and the similarities and differences in the expectations, wants, and needs of the community and provider are explored and analyzed. Interdisciplinary care aimed at ways to bridge the health gap existing in the community are developed and applied. A developmental approach is used to compare cultural practices and expectations throughout the life cycle, especially during significant life change events. Topics include adaptation to chronic illness, expression of pain, culturally relevant care in acute care, and cross-cultural differences in mental health and family health care. Specific cultural groups covered would be representative of the demographic patterning of the community surrounding Samuel Merritt University. Prerequisite: senior or graduate standing

NURSG 619 Advanced Pathophysiology (3 units)

This graduate-level course builds on prior knowledge of anatomy, physiology, and pathophysiology. It is expected that
students in the course already have a solid foundation of knowledge in basic anatomy, physiology, and basic pathophysiology. This knowledge should have been determined through previous coursework and possibly from the provision of hands-on nursing care in a variety of health care settings over a period of time. The major focus of the
course is the exploration of current theory and research related to pathophysiological processes as applied to commonly
encountered problems in family-oriented primary care practice, including physiological and mental health disorders. The course includes a life-span perspective, with content relevant to perinatal, pediatric, adult, and geriatric clients. Application of content to the care of diverse multicultural populations is emphasized.

NURSG 620/620L Case Management (6-8 units)

The course provides an overview of the health care delivery system and managed care systems as part of the delivery system. Health care organizational theory and structure, economics of health care, systems management, and ethical and legal issues are discussed in relation to managed care. Interdisciplinary collaboration and the role of nursing on the health care team and in managed care systems are examined. The clinical experience provides the student with an opportunity to apply theories and concepts to a select group of clients. Prerequisites: Licensure as a registered nurse; NURSG 612; NURSG 603 or NURSG 607; and completion of at least 12 units of graduate coursework (NURSG 600 and above courses). (3 units lecture, 3-5 units clinical)

NURSG 621L Case Management Clinical Practice and Seminar (3 units)

The clinical focus course provides students the opportunity to expand skills in the delivery of nursing care within a managed care/case management framework to a population of interest. The seminar component of the course will allow students to share insights into their developing roles. (3 units clinical: 8 hours practice, 1 hour seminar/week)

NURSG 622 Interpreting Healthcare in a Global World (1 unit)

This course explores primary healthcare as well being in the context of globalization in an international setting.The influences of history, tradition, culture, and language, are examined from an interpretive postmodern perspective. A service and learning tour in Southeast Asian village settings is used as a medium to develop new understandings concerning notions of care, ethical action, and identity based on the critical hermeneutics of Paul Ricoeur and Richard Kearney.  In addition to the travel experience, course activities include reading, discussion and a trip journal.

NURSG 623/623L Advanced Health Assessment for Nurse Case Managers (3 units)

This course focuses on the strategies and skills needed to assess individuals throughout the life span in a case management setting. The expected outcome is competency in advanced health assessment as a Nurse Case Manager. The analysis of assessment data, based on developmental and ethnic variation, is integrated into the case management clinical decision making process. Advanced health/physical assessment includes the comprehensive history, physical and psychological assessment of signs and symptoms, pathophysiologic changes, and psychosocial variations of the client: the individual, family, or community. If the client is an individual, the assessment should occur within the context of the family and community and should incorporate cultural and developmental variations and needs of the client. The purpose of this comprehensive assessment is to develop a thorough understanding of the client in order to determine appropriate and effective health care including health promotion strategies. (2 units lecture, 1 unit lab)

NURSG 624 Advanced Pathophysiology for Nurse Case Managers (2 units)

This course provides the theoretical framework for understanding disease processes and physiological aberrations in all ages, including chronic illness and population health. Emphasis will be placed on the application of pathophysiology in the identification of common disease processes, clinical syndromes, and the trajectory and management of illness throughout a lifespan.

NURSG 625 Advanced Pharmacological Management for Nurse Case Managers (2 units)

The focus of advanced pharmacological management for nurse case managers is clinical therapeutics, and it builds on prior knowledge of drug classifications, actions, interactions and side effects. The course concentrates learning on medications that are used in case management practice. Emphasis is placed on learning the clinical use of drugs in the management of specific illnesses throughout a lifespan; to include therapeutic dosages, clinical endpoints, patient monitoring plans and patient education. Health-related information and medication compliance issues are of foremost concern throughout the course. This course builds on a sound foundation of pharmacology to facilitate comprehensive disease management. 

NURSG 626 Theoretical Foundations for Advanced Practice Nursing (3 units)

This course explores the principles, practice, scientific inquiry, and the integration of contemporary theories in Advanced Practice Nursing (APN). Learners will analyze selected theoretical frameworks and their application to clinical practice. Foundational theories specific to the domains of clinical practice, informatics, patient safety, and ethics will be examined. The principles of interdisciplinary education and practice are also emphasized.

NURSG 627 Pharmacology Comprehensive Examination (PCE) (1 unit)

All students in the Program of Nurse Anesthesia (PNA) are required to complete all core MSN courses and a special synthesis project to satisfy the Synthesis requirement for a Master of Science in Nursing from SMU. There are 3 components of the special synthesis project in the senior academic curriculum: NURSG 627, the pharmacology comprehensive exams (PCE); NURSG 628, oral comprehensive examinations; and NURSG 629, the National Certification Examination (NCE) prep series 1 & 2 and Anesthesia Crisis Resource Management (ACRM) simulation sessions 1 & 2. During this course students prepare and complete the PNA PCE.

NURSG 628 Oral Comprehensive Examination (OCE) (1 unit)

All students in the Program of Nurse Anesthesia (PNA) are required to complete all core MSN courses and a special synthesis project to satisfy the Synthesis requirement for a Master of Science in Nursing from SMU. There are 3 components of the special synthesis project in the senior academic curriculum: NURSG 627, the pharmacology comprehensive exams (PCE); NURSG 628, oral comprehensive examinations; and NURSG 629, the National Certification Examination (NCE) prep series 1 & 2 and Anesthesia Crisis Resource Management (ACRM) simulation sessions 1 & 2. During this course students prepare and take the PNA OCE.

NURSG 629 National Certification Examination (NCE) Prep Series and Anesthesia Crisis Resource Management (ACRM) Simulation Series (2 units)

All students in the Program of Nurse Anesthesia (PNA) are required to complete all core MSN courses and a special synthesis project to satisfy the Synthesis requirement for a Master of Science in Nursing from SMU. There are 3 components of the special synthesis project in the senior academic curriculum: NURSG 627, the pharmacology comprehensive exams (PCE); NURSG 628, oral comprehensive examinations (OCE); and NURSG 629, the National Certification Examination (NCE) prep series 1 & 2 and Anesthesia Crisis Resource Management (ACRM) simulation sessions 1 & 2. During this course students prepare to take the NCE and participate in ACRM simulation sessions.

NURSG 631 Advanced Acute and Chronic Pain Management (2 units)

This course addresses advanced concepts of nurse anesthesia practice, specifically theoretical and practical considerations involved in the management of acute and chronic pain. Aspects of human anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology and pharmacology as they are related to the diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic pain are considered. Emphasis will be placed on the integration and application of basic and advanced principles of nurse anesthesia to achieve effective acute and chronic pain management across all cultures. Healthcare policy related to the role of the CRNA in acute and chronic pain management will also be discussed.

NURSG 641/641L Orthopedic Primary Care: Musculoskeletal Assessment & Diagnosis (3 units)

This course focuses on the strategies and skills needed to identify and diagnose common musculoskeletal disorders and stable fractures in individuals throughout the life span in a primary care setting with diverse populations. The expected outcome is advanced competency in assessing and diagnosing musculoskeletal conditions and stable fractures commonly seen in primary care practice. Analysis of assessment options based on developmental and ethnic variation is included. This course includes a review of functional musculoskeletal anatomy and physiology as well as focused physical assessment skills. Prerequisite: Acceptance in FNP program or permission from the program director. The lab course is taken concurrently with NURSG 641, which focuses on the strategies and skills needed to identify and diagnose common musculoskeletal conditions in individuals throughout the life span in primary care settings with diverse populations. The expected outcome is advanced competency in assessing and diagnosing musculoskeletal conditions and stable fractures commonly seen in primary care practice. Analysis of assessment options based on developmental and ethnic variation is included. This course includes a review of functional musculoskeletal anatomy and physiology as well as focused physical assessment skills. Prerequisite: Acceptance in FNP program or permission from the program director. (2 units lecture, 1 unit lab)

NURSG 642/ 642L Treatment & Collaborative Care (3 units)

This course focuses on the strategies and skills needed to identify, prevent, and manage stable musculoskeletal conditions in individuals throughout the life span in a family-oriented primary care setting with diverse populations. The expected outcome is advanced competency in managing musculoskeletal conditions commonly seen in primary care practice. Analysis of treatment options based on developmental and ethnic variation is included. This course emphasizes the integration of evidence based guidelines and the performance of basic clinical skills pertinent to musculoskeletal care. The lab course is taken concurrently with NURSG 642, which focuses on the strategies and skills needed to identify, prevent, and manage stable musculoskeletal conditions in individuals throughout the life span in a family-oriented primary care setting with diverse populations. The expected outcome is advanced competency in managing musculoskeletal conditions commonly seen in primary care practice. Analysis of treatment options based on developmental and ethnic variation is included. This course emphasizes the integration of evidence based guidelines and the performance of basic clinical skills pertinent to musculoskeletal care. Prerequisites: NURSG 641, NURSG 641L, NURSG 643L (2 units lecture, 1 unit lab)

NURSG 643L Clinical Practicum (2 units)

This course builds on NURSG 641L and continues to investigate musculoskeletal healthcare services within the context of evolving standards for evidence-based practice. In this course, the learner is immersed in a variety of clinical settings and given the opportunity to apply these evolving standards in the provision of musculoskeletal healthcare services. This course is taken in conjunction with NURSG 641 which covers stable and chronic musculoskeletal conditions across the lifespan. Musculoskeletal assessment and diagnosis are emphasized. Prerequisites: Enrollment in NURSG 641 and NURSG 641L

NURSG 644L Clinical Practicum (2 units)

This course builds on NURSG 643L and continues to investigate musculoskeletal healthcare services within the context of evolving standards for evidence-based practice. In this course, the learner is immersed in a variety of clinical settings and given the opportunity to apply these evolving standards in the provision of musculoskeletal healthcare services. This course is taken in conjunction with NURSG 642 and NURSG 642L and covers stable and chronic musculoskeletal conditions across the lifespan. Musculoskeletal treatment and collaborative care are emphasized. Prerequisites: NURSG 641, NURSG 641L, NURSG 643L

NURSG 649/649L – Advanced Health Assessment – Nurse Anesthesia (3 units)

This course focuses on the refinement of skills and strategies required to assess individuals throughout the life span in preparation for the range of anesthesia patient services provided in acute care settings. The expected outcome is competency in the cognitive, psychomotor, and interpersonal skills required of nurse anesthetists to complete thorough patient assessments pre-and postanesthetic procedures, and to develop a sound, evidence-based anesthetic plan. Analysis of the physical assessment data takes into account developmental and cultural patient variations, as well as the systems variations of acute care hospitals. Emphasis is placed on integration of assessment data in the clinical decision making process. Simulation-based methodologies (SBM) are heavily integrated into the course.

NURSG 651/651L Principles of Anesthesia I (4 units)

Lecture and seminar discussions introducing the basic principles of anesthesia practice. Includes historical perspectives of the profession, standards of practice, anesthesia assessment and monitoring principles, fundamental technical skills (airway management, use of essential anesthesia equipment) case planning protocols, and strategies for interventions and problem-solving throughout the perioperative period. Laboratory sessions, including the use of an anesthesia patient simulator, are designed to operationalize theoretical concepts. (3 units lecture, 1 unit lab)

NURSG 652 Advanced Pharmacology I (4 units)

First course in a series of two that focuses on advanced pharmacological concepts in anesthetic administration including pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics and toxicology profiles of primary anesthetic agents. Problem-solving applications in the clinical area are utilized.

NURSG 653 Advanced Pathophysiology (3 units)

Lecture and discussion of pathologic states common to the surgical population which may affect in some substantial way the delivery of anesthesia. Content will be focused on primary disease processes, common therapies, and their relation to perioperative planning and case management.

NURSG 654 Advanced Pharmacology II (3 units)

Second course in a series of two courses that focuses on advanced pharmacological concepts in anesthetic administration including pharmacodynamic, pharmacokinetic, and toxicology profiles of adjunct anesthetic drugs and agents. Problem-solving applications in the clinical area are utilized.

NURSG 655/655L Principles of Anesthesia II (6 units)

Lecture and seminar discussion in the study of the anesthetic implications of common and complex patient comorbidities (anemia, endocrine disorders, diabetes mellitus, morbid obesity, immunologic and mental disease) through the lifespan (pediatric through geriatric) and management of selected surgical procedures. Focus is on the procedural requirements of the surgeries, equipment used for anesthesia and surgery, and the appropriate anesthetic techniques and strategies, taking into account the patient’s comorbidities including age related needs (and all other relevant facets of the perioperative setting). Advanced technical skills (regional anesthesia, difficult airway management, invasive monitoring) are covered in simulated sessions (laboratory) which also utilizes the anesthesia patient simulator to further operationalize theoretical and critical thinking concepts. (4 units lecture, 2 units lab)

NURSG 656L Clinical Anesthesia I (1 unit)

Supervised experiences in clinical anesthetic management of ASA class I and II patients involving all perioperative activities of general, regional and MAC cases.  Case distribution and management will fulfill the requirements of the Council on Accreditation of Nurse Anesthesia Educational Programs (S/U).

NURSG 657/657L Human Anatomy and Physiology (5 units)

Lecture, laboratory, and discussion concerning functional activities of the living body in terms of both cellular and systemic functions. Content includes membrane characteristics and function, synaptic transmission, neurophysiology, cardiovascular function, respiratory mechanics, including control and exchange, digestion, renal function, fluid regulation, and homeostasis. Gross anatomy includes study of head and neck, thorax, and plexus of the upper extremity. (3 units lecture, 2 units lab)

NURSG 658L Clinical Anesthesia II (3 units)

Supervised experiences in clinical anesthetic management of ASA class I, II and III patients involving all perioperative activities of general, regional and MAC cases. Case distribution and management will fulfill the requirements of the Council on Accreditation of Nurse Anesthesia Educational Programs (S/U).

NURSG 659 Professional Aspects of Practice (3 units)

Course includes an analysis of the professional components of nurse anesthesia practice emphasizing ethical, social, legal, and regulatory responsibilities of the CRNA practitioner.

NURSG 660 Advanced Principles of Anesthesia I (4 units)

Integrated and comprehensive study of unique physiologic and pathologic states of primary body systems through the lifespan (prenatal to geriatric) related to the provision of anesthesia care to patients undergoing complex vascular and thoracic procedures. Also includes comprehensive study of unique physiologic and pathologic states affecting anesthesia care to the high-risk obstetric patients.

NURSG 661L Clinical Anesthesia III (2 units)

Supervised experiences in clinical anesthetic management of ASA I-IV classifications involving all perioperative activities of general and regional cases. Case distribution and management will fulfill the requirement of the Council on Accreditation of Nurse Anesthesia Educational Programs (S/U).

NURSG 662 Advanced Principles of Anesthesia II (3 units)

This course presents and explores an integrated and comprehensive approach to the unique physiologic and pathologic states of patients through the lifespan (neonatal through geriatric). Topics include anesthesia management of complex surgeries including the following: intracranial, extracranial, trauma, traumatic brain injury, cardiovascular, spinal, transplant and neuromuscular diseases. Areas of focus include the anesthesia management of multisystem disease states and management of their complications.

NURSG 663L Clinical Anesthesia IV (3 units)

Supervised experiences in clinical anesthetic management of specialty cases involving high-risk obstetrics, neonates, pediatrics, neurology, and cardiothoracic. Case distribution and management will fulfill the requirement of the Council on Accreditation of Nurse Anesthesia Educational Programs (S/U).

NURSG 664L Clinical Anesthesia V (3 units)

Supervised experiences in clinical anesthetic management or specialty cases involving pain management, respiratory/critical care, and other Council on Accreditation requirements for advanced specialty practice. Case distribution and management will fulfill the requirement of the Council on Accreditation of Nurse Anesthesia Educational Programs (S/U).

NURSG 665L Clinical Anesthesia VI (1 unit)

Supervised experiences in clinical anesthetic management of specialty cases involving advanced patient management techniques in medically complex cases involving multisystem disease. Case distribution and management will fulfill the requirement of the Council on Accreditation of Nurse Anesthesia Educational Programs (S/U).

NURSG 670 Family Centered Advanced Practice Nursing (2 units)

Healthcare in the 21 st century requires APRNs to incorporate a broad set of concerns that influence health and family life. In this course, global health and environmental justice are explored as pre-conditions for healthy families. The influences of culture, society, behavior, and human development on the health of families are explored. The course examines family-centered healthcare in relation to interprofessional collaboration, evidence based practice, quality improvement, and safety.

NURSG 671/ 671L Advanced Physical Assessment (3 units)

This course focuses on the strategies and skills needed to assess individuals throughout the life span in a family-oriented primary care setting with diverse populations. The expected outcome is an advanced physical assessment competency appropriate for the primary care practice. Analysis of assessment data based on developmental and ethnic variation is included. The integration of assessment data in the clinical decision-making process is emphasized. The lab course is taken concurrently with NURSG 671 that focuses on the strategies and skills needed to assess individuals throughout the life span in a family-oriented primary care setting with diverse populations. The expected outcome is an advanced physical assessment competency appropriate for the primary care practice. Analysis of assessment data based on developmental and cultural variation is included. The integration of assessment data in the clinical decision making process is emphasized. (2 unit lecture, 1 unit lab)

NURSG 672 Professional Role and Advocacy for APRNs (2 unit)

This course is designed to introduce the APRN student to the role of the advanced practice nurse in the primary healthcare setting. The evolution of the role from an historical and legislative perspective is explored. Issues including the evolving scope of practice, key role competencies, and inter-professional collaboration are introduced. Each student will be expected to discuss their own philosophical/ethical framework for clinical practice. Each student will be expected to discuss their own philosophical/ethical framework for clinical practice. Students will address critical issues that primary care providers may face daily. Students will address critical issues that primary care providers may face daily, including the influence of cultural values and beliefs of clients and providers. This course will also emphasize leadership and entrepreneurial aspects of practice development, maintenance, and evaluation. This course is intended to help prepare the APRN to succeed in their first year of practice.

NURSG 673 Professional Advocacy for Entry to the Advanced Practice Role (1 unit)

This is the second in a series of two courses designed to socialize the student into the role of nurse practitioner. Seminars deal with the critical analysis of theories, issues, and research related to the NP role in primary health care. Emphasis is on leadership and entrepreneurial aspects of practice development, maintenance, and evaluation. It is intended to prepare the FNP to negotiate and begin the first year of practice.

NURSG 674 Health Protection, Promotion and Screening for Individuals, Families, and Communities (3 units)

Collaborative inter-professional family-centered primary healthcare is influenced by 21 st century innovations in technology, genetics, behavior/change theories, and environmental health. This course integrates these influences into the provision of healthcare services focused on health protection and promotion, disease prevention, and health screening across the lifespan. Critical analysis of clinical strategies and interventions in health promotion and protection based on the evidence and relevant theoretical frameworks are included. The effects of social, cultural and developmental influences are emphasized. Prerequisites: NURSG 670, NURSG 671/671L, NURSG 619, NURSG 677

NURSG 675/675L Care of Acute and Episodic Conditions (4 units)

This course builds on NURSG 674 by focusing on the assessment, diagnosis, management, and patient education of common acute episodic illnesses across the lifespan. The course emphasizes evidence-based healthcare that is both patient-centered and provided in the context of a healthcare team. For each condition included the genetic, environmental, epidemiological, pathophysiological, cultural, and family implications are considered. Diagnostic reasoning/testing in primary care including radiology, laboratory, microbiology, advanced imaging, and EKG are identified for each condition along with considerations of access, cost, efficacy, and quality as essential elements in planning healthcare services. The role of the NP as patient advocate, the process of negotiating an individualized treatment plan, the patient’s right to refuse care, safety, and privacy requirements are included. The lab course is taken concurrently with NURSG 675. Learning strategies include simulation-based case studies and skills lab hours. Skills lab sessions focus on common office procedures performed in the primary care setting and clinical case discussions. Emphasis will be placed on interpretation of laboratory and diagnostic results and evaluation and management of patients based on such results. Prerequisites: NURSG 670, NURSG 601, NURSG 674, NURSG 677 (3 units lecture, 1 unit lab)

NURSG 676 Care of Chronic and Complex Conditions (3 units)

Trends in healthcare include an aging population, multiple comorbidities, and increasing lifespan. Linked with these issues is a move to care for people in the community rather than in the acute care setting. The goal of this course is to identify and explore the care of persons with multiple co-morbidities including but not limited to diabetes, cardiovascular disease, rheumatologic, and pulmonary conditions. The focus of evaluation intervention and treatment emphasizes the importance of quality of life, normal aging, and the optimization of health status in persons with chronic illnesses. Prerequisite: NURSG 674, NURSG 675

NURSG 677 Advanced Pharmacology (3 units)

This course in clinical pharmacotherapeutics builds on prior knowledge of drug classifications, prototypes within classifications, actions, interactions, and side effects. The major focus is on medications that are commonly prescribed in the treatment and management of common acute and chronic illnesses in primary for patients across the lifespan. Emphasis is placed on safe and effective prescribing and supporting patient adherence. Legal considerations for furnishing controlled substances are also addressed. Prerequisite: Admission to the FNP program or consent of instructor

NURSG 678L Clinical Practicum (4 units)

Healthcare is undergoing an information explosion. Implementation of new and evolving standards for practice addresses issues of patient safety, the use of culturally and linguistically appropriate services (CLAS), informatics, and healthcare that is both team-based and patientcentered. Moreover it is crucial that everyone involved in healthcare work together to improve both the health care system and the health of people through practice inquiry. In this course the learner is immersed in a variety of clinical settings and given the opportunity to apply these evolving standards in the provision of healthcare services. This clinical course is taken either concurrently with NURSG 674 or after taking NURSG 674.

NURSG 679L Clinical Practicum (4 units)

This course builds on NURSG 678L and continues to investigate healthcare services within the context of evolving standards for evidence-based practice. In this course the learner is immersed in a variety of clinical settings and given the opportunity to apply these evolving standards in the provision of healthcare services. This course emphasizes acute episodic healthcare conditions across the lifespan. This clinical course is taken either concurrently with NURSG 675 or after taking NURSG 675.

NURSG 680L Internship (6 units)

This course builds on NURSG 678L and NURSG 679L by expanding the learner’s focus to include the management of common complex chronic conditions. Again, in this course the learner is immersed in a variety of clinical settings and given the opportunity to apply the knowledge, skills, and attitudes to assess, diagnose, and develop a treatment plan across the lifespan. This clinical course is taken concurrently with NURSG 676 with an emphasis on chronic and complex healthcare problems. (6 units practicum)

NURSG 686 Healthcare Informatics (3 units)

Using an interactive, evidence-based learning methodology, this course provides participants with a broad-based introduction to healthcare informatics. Students explore application and functionality of information technology, develop skills in evaluation of systems interfaces and come to appreciate how a strong information technology infrastructure enhances healthcare systems performance and outcomes, quality process improvement, tracking, compliance, and strategic planning.

NURSG 697 Individual Independent Study (3 units)

Individual study with emphasis on special problems in health sciences (under the direction of faculty). Students may select areas of study which are related to their area of interest or future goals.

NURSG 698 Group Independent Study (3 units)

Groups of two or more collaborate in studies of special problems in health sciences (under the direction of faculty). Students may select areas related to their future research or clinical program.

NURSG 700 Evidence-Based Translation for Advanced Nursing Practice (3 units)

This course examines evidence-based practice and translational scientific processes and applications which support competence in knowledge application activities. These activities include the study of implementation interventions, factors, and contextual variables that affect knowledge uptake and use in practices and communities, the translation of research into practice, the evaluation of practice, improvement of healthcare practice and outcomes, and participation in collaborative research. Students will assess evidence for translation, design a translation process and evaluation, and conduct an analysis of translation challenges, barriers, and ethical and legal issues. Prerequisite: NURSG 772

NURSG 701 lnterprofessional Collaboration: Improving Patient and Population Health Outcomes (3 units)

This interprofessional (IP) collaboration course prepares the DNP graduate to participate in and lead multi-tiered health care teams. The curriculum is based on the principles of the lnterprofessional Education Consortium (IPEC) on the work of IP teams, the Core Competencies for lnterprofessional Collaborative Practice, and the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) perspective on lnterprofessional Professionalism. Students will participate in an IP team and develop a demonstration project that is IP based.

NURSG 702 Health Care Policy for Advocacy in Health Care (3 units)

The Health Care Policy course focuses on the critical analysis of health policy in support of strategic action, advocacy, and leadership. Models of policy analysis; economic, legal and ethical analysis; incorporating debate to implement decision making, will provide preparation for the design and implementation of health care policy that frames health care financing, practice regulation, access, safety, quality, and efficacy. This course enhances the capacity for the facilitation, development and implementation of health policy at institutional, local, state, regional, federal, and international levels. Prerequisites: Completion of N772

NURSG 703 Epidemiology and Population Health (3 units)

This course examines the patterns of disease and health related problems in populations and the potential for health promotion and health service program to address health disparities. Students will apply epidemiological principles, concepts, and methodologies in their evaluation of health related data and research to selected populations. The course will provide students with a foundation to develop an epidemiological overview of their population of interest. Prerequisite: statistics

NURSG 704 Biostatistics (3 units)

This course provides a deeper understanding of statistical concepts and analytical methods as applied to data encountered in health sciences. Topics include probability theory and distributions; population parameters and their sample estimates; descriptive statistics for central tendency and dispersion; hypothesis testing and confidence intervals for means, variances, and proportions; linear correlation and regression model; analysis of variance; and nonparametric methods. The course provides students a solid foundation to evaluate research more critically. Prerequisite: statistics

NURSG 705 Organizational and Systems Leadership in Complex Health Care Systems (3 units)

This course provides students with the theoretical and analytical preparation to evaluate organizations from a macro perspective. It focuses on organizational leadership and incorporates theory and research as it applies to the role of the Doctor of Nursing Practice in a variety of settings. Students will critically examine the purpose and function of healthcare organizations, from the discipline-specific theories of sociology, political science, anthropology and economics. Students will become familiar with a variety of perspectives and theoretical frameworks often used to describe organizational structure. Students will also examine theories of organizational change and analyze how these can be applied to increase safety, effectiveness and quality in the health care setting. Demonstrate understanding of the purpose and function of organizations, specifically human service organizations.

NURSG 706 Information Systems & Technology for Advanced Practice Nursing (3 units)

This course examines health information technology (HIT) for advanced nursing practice. In this course students will evaluate existing and emerging practice-based HIT tools and processes for their potential to improve health care targeting individuals and populations. Students will also design an innovative practiced-based technology tool or process to enhance evidence-based practice and collaboration among patients, providers, and inter-professional work-groups. Prerequisite: NURSG 772, NURSG 700, & NURSG 705

NURSG 707 Health Protection, Promotion and Screening (3 units)

This course integrates the concepts of family-centered healthcare over the life span in the clinic setting. In addition, the FNP/DNP student analyzes the concept of pre disease when working with vulnerable populations. Topics in this course will range from prevention of disease, promotion of health and screening as well as other topics. Prerequisite: N772, N773

NURSG 710 Health Care Economics and Financial Analysis for Health Professionals (3 units)

This course addresses the role of health care economics and financing within the US healthcare system and their influence on the ability to improve population health. A variety of essential health economic and financial theories and principles are introduced. Students will examine the interrelationship of health care financing and regulations to the structure and delivery of care within a range of practice models and healthcare delivery systems. Students will apply selected economic, financing and business principles for the purpose of making pragmatic decisions that support improved health care delivery through practice and or system re-design.

NURSG 714 Educational Innovations (3 units)

This course will provide the students an opportunity to explore innovative educational techniques utilized in either the practice or educational setting. Students will explore current literature and research on diverse teaching strategies and their effectiveness in promoting learning. Students will have the opportunity to analyze theories of learning, innovative pedagogical methodologies and evaluate their effectiveness.

NURSG 715 Outcomes Management and Evaluation (3 units)

This course will focus on the development of a structured framework of concepts and core competencies designed to promote achievement, measurement and evaluation of desired health outcomes in individuals, groups and populations. Quality of care, quality improvement, consumer-driven care and evidence-based practice are increasingly important in the healthcare system and these concepts will be included in this course. The delivery of care will be evaluated in terms of best evidence, client values/beliefs, available resources, and clinical expertise.

NURSG 719 Advanced Pathophysiology (3 units)

This graduate-level course builds on prior knowledge of anatomy, physiology, and pathophysiology. It is expected that students in the course already have a solid foundation of knowledge in basic anatomy, physiology, and basic pathophysiology. This knowledge should have been determined through previous coursework and possibly from the provision of hands-on nursing care in a variety of health care settings over a period of time. The major focus of the course is the exploration of current theory and research related to pathophysiological processes as applied to commonly encountered problems in family-oriented primary care practice, including physiological and mental health disorders. The course includes a life-span perspective, with content relevant to perinatal, pediatric, adult, and geriatric clients. Application of content to the care of diverse multicultural populations is emphasized.

NURSG 720 ANP Project Conceptualization and Design (2 unit)

This course is the first of two courses that support the development and implementation of a population focused, evidence-based DNP project relevant to advanced nursing practice. In this course, students will review the requirements and expectations for a DNP project, examine completed DNP projects, identify their project focus and context, assemble their project committee, and create a project prospectus.

NURSG 721 Advanced Nursing Practice Project Management (2 units)

This course is the second of two courses focused on the design and preparation for a DNP project that is population focused, evidence-based, and relevant to advanced nursing practice. In this course students will review their prospectus and develop a detailed project protocol and timeline, estimate project financial and other costs, complete human subjects protection training, complete an internal Graduate Division project review, secure required permissions such as clinical contracts and/or IRB approval, and complete preparation to implement their project.

NURSG 723 DNP Project Presentation (1 unit)

This course includes an on campus seminar for students to present their completed Capstone projects and to participate, along with peers, advisors and faculty, in meaningful dialogue and evaluations of the projects and the implications for practice.

NURSG 730L DNP Project Residency (5 units)

This residency provides a mentored experience in a practice setting and is designed to allow students to synthesize and integrate knowledge in the implementation of their capstone project. It is expected that each student will complete a minimum 270 hours of DNP practice immersion planned conjointly by the nurse doctorate student, the faculty advisor and the practice mentor.

NURSG 731 Advanced Nursing Practice Residency (2 units)

This course is the second of a three-course series which supports the implementation, management, completion, and dissemination of a population focused, evidence-based DNP project relevant to advanced nursing practice. In this second course students will continue to work with their Chair and committee on the implementation and evaluation of their project.

NURSG 732 Advanced Nursing Practice Residency III (2 units)

This course is the third of a three-course series which supports the implementation, management, completion, and dissemination of a population focused, evidence-based DNP project relevant to advanced nursing practice. In this third course students will complete the implementation and evaluation of their project, present their project results, and prepare a written deliverable of their project.  Prerequisite: NURSG 720, NURSG 721, NURSG 730, NURSG 731

NURSG 770/770L Advanced Physical Assessment (4 units)

This course focuses on the strategies and skills needed to assess individuals throughout the life span in a family-oriented primary care setting with diverse populations. The expected outcome is advanced physical assessment competency appropriate for the primary care practice. Analysis of assessment data based on developmental and ethnic variation is included. The integration of assessment data in the clinical decision making process is emphasized. This lab course is taken concurrently with Advanced Physical Assessment lecture that focuses on the strategies and skills needed to assess individuals throughout the life span in a family-oriented primary care setting with diverse populations. The expected outcome is advanced physical assessment competency appropriate for the primary care practice. Analysis of assessment data based on developmental and cultural variation is included. The integration of assessment data in the clinical decision making process is emphasized. (2 units lecture, 2 units lab)

NURSG 772 Nursing and Healthcare Science for Advanced Nursing Practice (3 units)

This Course explores the philosophical and theoretical foundation for nursing science and praxis focusing on the doctoral role in translating and generating knowledge for practice. The process of evaluating and integrating biophysical, psychosocial, analytic, and organizational knowledge and interprofessional evidence-based best practices into healthcare delivery is examined. Activities for knowledge application to achieve a deliberately engineered practice using planned-action theory are introduced. Students generate a practice paradigm for the production of practice-based knowledge and formulate a practice-based concept analysis. Prerequisites: Entry to DNP program

NURSG 773 Ethical Foundations and Role Development of the APN (3 units)

This course integrates important legal concepts along with social/ political issues foundational to the development of the Advanced Practice Nurse as clinician, leader, and educator. In particular, this course considers these threads in anticipation of future developments. For example, in the area of ethics, the course moves beyond the traditional view of healthcare ethics based on the Hippocratic Oath. Instead, the student considers a more expansive view that is, by design, interdisciplinary. In addition, the historical perspective sets the stage for the examination of influences from the psychosocial, legal and political thinking that inform the discussion surrounding full practice authority. The student develops an e-portfolio to codify their educational, clinical and professional experiences that support their entry into practice. The course concludes with preparation to meet credentialing, certification and regulatory requirements. Prerequisites: Acceptance into the FNP/DNP program

NURSG 774 Population Health & Clinical Prevention (3 units)

This course examines population health defined as the distribution of health outcomes within a population, the range of personal, social, economic, and environmental factors that influence the distribution of health outcomes, and the policies and interventions that affect those factors.* Students will conduct an in depth assessment of the health status of a population as the foundation for the health planning process and the development of clinical prevention and population health interventions for individuals, aggregates, and populations.

NURSG 775/775L Care of Acute and Episodic Conditions (4 units)

This course builds on Health Promotion and Prevention by focusing on the assessment, diagnosis, management, and patient education of common acute and episodic conditions across the lifespan. The course emphasizes evidence-based health care that is both patient-centered and provided in the context of a healthcare team. For each condition included, environmental, epidemiological, pathophysiological, and cultural and family implications are considered. Diagnostic reasoning or diagnostic testing in primary care including laboratory interpretation, radiology and advanced imaging, and common primary care procedures are identified for each condition along with considerations of access, cost, efficacy, ethics, and quality as essential elements in planning health care services for acute and episodic conditions. Additional topics explored in the course include the role of the family nurse practitioner (FNP) as patient advocate and negotiator for a patient treatment plan, patient's rights, and safety and privacy requirements. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Semesters 1-4 (3 units lecture, 1 unit lab)

NURSG 776 Care of Chronic And Complex Conditions (3 units)

Trends in healthcare include an aging population, multiple comorbidities, and increasing lifespan. Linked with these issues is a move to care for people in the community rather than in the acute care setting. The goal of this course is to identify and explore the care of persons with multiple co-morbidities including but not limited to diabetes, cardio vascular disease, rheumatologic, and pulmonary conditions. The focus of evaluation, intervention and treatment emphasizes the importance of quality of life, normal aging and the optimization of health status in persons with chronic illnesses. Prerequisite: successful completion of semester 1-5 NURSG

777 Advanced Pharmacology (3 units)

This course in clinical pharmacotherapeutics builds on prior knowledge of drug classifications, prototypes within classifications, actions, interactions, and side effects. The major focus is on medications that are commonly prescribed in the treatment and management of common acute and chronic illnesses' in primary for patients across the lifespan. Emphasis is placed on safe and effective prescribing and supporting patient adherence. Legal considerations for furnishing controlled substances are also addressed.

NURSG 778L FNP Clinical I (4 units)

This course offers the student the opportunity to apply and evaluate research, theories, concepts and skills in a variety of primary care settings under the supervision of the preceptor. The direct provision of family oriented primary care nursing services, including wellness, acute-emergent and chronic care management is emphasized.

NURSG 779L FNP Clinical II (4 units)

continues to investigate health care services within the context of evolving standards for evidence-based practice. In this course, the learner is immersed in a variety of clinical settings and given the opportunity to apply these evolving standards in the provision of health care services. This course emphasizes acute and episodic health care conditions across the lifespan. Prerequisite: successful completion of semester 1-7

NURSG 781L FNP Clinical Ill (4 units)

This course builds on FNP Clinical I and II by expanding the learner's focus to include the management of common complex chronic conditions. In this course, the learner is immersed in a variety of clinical settings and given the opportunity to apply the knowledge, skills, and attitudes to assess, diagnose, and develop treatment plan across the lifespan. This clinical course has an emphasis on chronic and complex health care problems. Prerequisite: successful completion of semester 1-8

OCCTH 601 Integrative Seminar in Occupational Therapy Practices I (1 unit)

This is the first of the three course series that facilitates students' acquisition of clinical and critical reasoning skills necessary for occupational therapy practices. The courses encourage students to develop the critical thinking and knowledge acquisition skills required to develop relevant clinical skills. The courses use problem-based learning (PBL) and actual client contacts to enable students to apply clinical reasoning and sound theory to the occupational therapy process. This introduction course focuses on developing students' personal insight into individual learning preferences, social-cultural experiences and perception, and communication styles. Additionally, this course intends to develop students' observation skills and beginning application of OT concepts.

OCCTH 602 Integrative Seminar in Occupational Therapy Practices II (1 unit)

This is the second of the four course series that facilitates students’ acquisition of clinical and critical reasoning skills necessary for occupational therapy practices. This course encourages students to develop the critical thinking and knowledge acquisition skills required to develop relevant clinical skills. The course uses problem-based learning (PBL) and high fidelity simulation to enable students to apply clinical reasoning and sound theory to the occupational therapy process.

OCCTH 603 Integrative Seminar in Occupational Therapy Practices III (1 unit)

This is the third of a four course series that facilitates students’ acquisition of critical thinking and clinical reasoning skills necessary for occupational therapy practice. This course integrates students’ knowledge, gained in program coursework, by requiring application of this knowledge to specific and general clinical scenarios. The course uses a problem-based learning (PBL) format by infusing high fidelity simulation learning modules in order for students to develop clinical reasoning and sound theoretical bases essential to the work of an occupational therapist. This course focuses on honing students’ clinical observation and analytical skills necessary for prompt, precise, and accurate assessment of clients in the occupational therapy process.

OCCTH 604 Integrative Seminar in Occupational Therapy Practices IV (1 unit)

This is the third of a three course series that intends to facilitate students’ acquisition of clinical and critical reasoning skills necessary for occupational therapy practices. The course integrates the knowledge that students have gained in program coursework by applying the acquired OT skills and knowledge to specific and/or general life and clinical scenarios. The course uses a problem-based learning (PBL) format as the context by infusing high fidelity simulation learning modules in order for students to develop clinical reasoning and sound theoretical bases essential to the work of an occupational therapist.  Prerequisite: OT 601/701, OT 602/702, OT 624/724, OT 626/726, OT 632/732.

OCCTH 605 Cultue and Occupation (1 unit)

This entry-level master (MOT) and doctorate (OTD) course allows the student to investigate how structural forces in our society impact health outcomes beyond individual patient encounters.  Learning is achieved through active participation in individual and group interactions that demonstrate how implicit bias can be countered in clinical interactions.  Through the use of Healthy People 2030, learners will construct a plan to reduce health disparities through structural and social determinants of health lenses.  Co-requisite: OCCTH 601/701 Integrative Seminar I.  (0.5 units lecture, 0.5 units lab)

OCCTH 609 Introduction to Professional Documentation (1 unit)

This course provides an introduction to professional documentation appropriate to the practice needs of occupational therapists.

OCCTH 610/610L Anatomical & Physiological Bases for Human Occupation I (4.5 units) Structure/function relationships and relevant physiological mechanisms are examined in a detailed study of regional anatomy in the human body. Special emphasis is given to positional relationships of musculoskeletal structures and neurovascular elements; their corresponding functional roles in human activity, and the clinical implications of anatomical dysfunction. (2.5 units lecture, 2 units lab)

OCCTH 611 Foundations of Occupational Therapy Practice (3 units)

Introduction to the profession of occupational therapy, including history, philosophies, frames of reference, organization, standards, and supervision of aides and assistants. Introduction to methods and utilization of professional publication and audiovisual media. Therapeutic intervention will be critically examined with the model of human occupation.

OCCTH 612 Theories of Inquiry & Research Methodology (3 units)

Introduction to the philosophy and principles of the research process in the realm of occupational therapy. Includes scientific writing, literature reviews, methods of inquiry, research design, data collection, ethics, informed consent, and clinical reasoning used in field research.

OCCTH 613 Introduction to Psychopathology (1 unit)

This course provides the students an introduction to psychopathological diagnoses, disease processes, and symptoms and behavioral manifestations that are commonly seen in occupational therapy practice.

OCCTH 615 Scholarly Writing (1 unit)

This is a seminar course focusing on the technical aspects of understanding literature reviews and how to write them. The course will include the design and implementation of a highly focused and/or updated systematic review.  Students will build on what they’ve learned in the introductory research courses to create research questions, and search for, evaluate and synthesize articles into a completed systematic review.  Students will create and present a poster presentation disseminating the results of the systematic review. 

OCCTH 616/616L Therapeutic Media, Materials and Processes (2 units)

Laboratory and didactic course in daily living skills evaluation and activity analysis for the physically, psychologically, and cognitively impaired. Emphasis on strategies and media that promote adaptation to disabilities and increase role independence are taught using adaptive equipment, redesigning the environment, exploration of tools, materials, and uniform terminology. (1 unit lecture, 1 unit lab)

OCCTH 617/617L Interprofessional Communication in Healthcare (2 units)

This course allows the student to enhance professional effectiveness through the improvement of communication skills. Learning is achieved through active participation in individual and group interactions that mirror professional practice. (1 unit lecture, 1 unit lab)

OCCTH 618 Functional Neuroscience (3 units)

Review of neuroanatomy and physiology with emphasis on clinical manifestations of peripheral and central nervous system lesions. The anatomical review of blood supply, somatosensory motor systems, special senses, pain mechanisms, and cognitive, perceptual, and nerve pathways. Prerequisites: OCCTH 610, OCCTH 614.

OCCTH 619 Human Occupation Throughout the LifeSpan (3 units)

This course is an exploration of the stages of human development from conception to death with attention to occupational performance, biological, psychological, cognitive, and sociocultural health determinants. Emphasis will be placed on normal development and observation skills.  Co-requisite: OCCTH 611

OCCTH 621L Introduction to Fieldwork I (3 units)

This occurs after successful completion of the first year of studies. Guided observations and supervised fieldwork under the direction of clinical educators in clinical settings appropriate for the first year of the curriculum. The primary goal is for students to experientially enhance their observational skills and be introduced to OT practice with a variety of patients with whom an OT might work. Supervision of the student at this level does not need to be by an OT for one of the two experiences, but could be supervised by an individual in an allied health profession. The student must complete a minimum of 60 hours in each of two required settings (psychosocial and adult physical disabilities). An optional site in pediatrics may be requested, for 40 hours. In addition, students must attend an introductory seminar and a final seminar, each held on campus for a full day, immediately after finals week in the spring, and in the week before the start of the fall semester. Prerequisites: All first year coursework. (3 units clinical lab)

OCCTH 622L Guided Research Seminar (1 unit)

Implementation of a study or investigation of a specific treatment strategy or teaching module used in occupational therapy. Prerequisites: OCCTH 612, OCCTH 615. (1 unit lab)

OCCTH 624 Conditions of Human Dysfunction (3 units)

An overview of pathophysiology and management of neurological disorders, as well as general medical, surgical, and orthopedic conditions commonly seen in clinical practice. Emphasis will be placed on learning medical terminology, pathologic processes, medical management, remediation, and clinical techniques for therapeutic intervention. Prerequisites: OCCTH 610, OCCTH 611, OCCTH 614, OCCTH 627; Corequisite: successful completion or concurrent enrollment in OCCTH 618.

OCCTH 626/626L Theory and Practice in Psycho-social Dysfunction (4 units)

The course includes instruction in evaluation methods, social and psychological theories, and pharmacologic intervention strategies for persons experiencing psychosocial dysfunction. There is a focus on group process, self-esteem, stress management, and the use of purposeful activities for this population. An exploration of acute and chronic substance abuse and social issues is included. The clinical component of this course will allow students to provide group and individual treatment to individuals who have co-occurring disorders in an area outpatient clinic.  Prerequisite: OCCTH 611, OCCTH 616, OCCTH 613, OCCTH 619.  (3 lecture, 1 lab).

OCCTH 627/627L Applied Kinesiology and Biomechanics (4 units)

Analysis of human movement during occupations utilizing biomechanical principles. Laboratory experiences include manual testing, joint range of motion measurement, and kinesiological activity analyses. Osteokinematic as well as arthrokinematic concepts and abnormal movement patterns will be examined.  Prerequisites: successful completion of OCCTH 610. (3 units lecture, 1 unit lab)

OCCTH 628 Administration and Management (3 units)

Administration and organization of occupational therapy services within the current and future health care environment. Emphasis on consultation, quality assurance, program evaluation, functional outcome assessment, program evaluation, strategic planning, marketing, and budgeting in community-based services. Health care reform and third- party reimbursement issues are examined. Lab experiences will be incorporated within each class. Prerequisite: OCCTH 623

OCCTH 629/629L Theory and Practice in Physical Dysfunction (4 units)

Methods of evaluation, treatment planning, and implementation of interventions to address functional limitations due to physical dysfunction are presented in this course. Emphasis is placed on sensorimotor, cognitive, biomechanical, and neurodevelopmental treatment techniques. Biopsychosocial and mind-body considerations will be included in therapeutic intervention strategies. Inclass discussion and assignments will facilitate the clinical reasoning process, problem-solving, therapeutic application of interventions, and goal setting within the occupational therapy practice framework. The lab component provides hands-on learning of practical skills Prerequisites: OCCTH 611, OCCTH 612, OCCTH 616, OCCTH 624, OCCTH 625, OCCTH 627, OCCTH 632/632L. Co-requisites: OCCTH 631, OCCTH 636. (3 units lecture, 1 unit lab)

OCCTH 630 Research Synthesis Project (1 unit)

This course focuses on the successful completion of a synthesis project or a scholarly work which shows evidence of academic rigor, scientific inquiry, critical reasoning, creativity and/or clinical expertise. Prerequisites: OCCTH 612, OCCTH 615, OCCTH 622L

OCCTH 631/631L Occupational Adaptations and Introduction to Modalities (3 units)

An introduction to a variety of technologies used in the practice of occupational therapy. Evaluative, assistive, and adaptive equipment used to facilitate the occupational performance areas are discussed and demonstrated. Medical devices and procedures used in medical care and nursing are also investigated to prepare students for treating patients with a variety of medical conditions. Ergonomics, accessibility, and physical agent modalities are introduced. Prerequisites: OCCTH 610, OCCTH 611, OCCTH 614, OCCTH 616, OCCTH 618, OCCTH 624, OCCTH 625, OCCTH 627; Corequisites: OCCTH 629, OCCTH 636. (2 units lecture, 1 unit lab)

OCCTH 632/632L Advanced Clinical Practice (Children) (4 units)

Clinical experience to learn screening and assessment of conditions affecting children. Students will learn how to evaluate, develop treatment plans, provide intervention and discharge planning for children with physical, psycho-social, neurological, and sensory integrative delays. Labs will consist of evaluation and treatment of pediatric clients in the OT Community Participant Lab. Prerequisites: OCCTH 610, OCCTH 611, OCCTH 612, OCCTH 616, OCCTH 617, OCCTH 618, OCCTH 619, OCCTH 625, OCCTH 627; Corequisites: OCCTH 624. (2 units theory, 2 units lab)

OCCTH 633 Health Promotion and Wellness (2 units)

A critical review of traditional and non-traditional systems of health care based on the available evidence with an emphasis on health promotion and wellness. Various types of interventions will be discussed to manage health in the workplace, chronic pain and conditions caused by stress. In addition to manual therapies, mindfulness practice, self-reflection and complementary therapies will be demonstrated through “hands-on” experiences. Prerequisites: Anatomy and Physiology. Corequisite: Neuroscience. (1 unit lecture, 1 unit lab)

OCCTH 634 Professional Development Seminar (2 units)

Graduate seminar and an independent study course providing students with the opportunity to explore an area of occupational therapy practice in greater detail. Students will develop an individual learning contract of personal professional interest, which may take place in a variety of settings. The outcome will be a professional quality manuscript to be submitted for presentation at a professional conference. Students will meet once a week in seminar to discuss progress and professional and practice issues. Prerequisite: OCCTH 628.

OCCTH 636/636L Advanced Clinical Practice (Adults) (4 units)

This combined lecture and lab course provides students with advanced knowledge and skills for serving adults who have physical disabilities, primarily from neurological traumas and/or ailments. The critical skills of clinical reasoning, observation, and administration and interpretation of assessments are specifically emphasized. Students’ competence in addressing the social and cultural issues pertaining to occupations is also underscored. In the lab, students will execute the occupational therapy process with an assigned adult participant within the Community Participant Lab, guided by licensed occupational therapists and instructors. Prerequisites: OCCTH 610/710, OCCTH 611/711, OCCTH 612/712, OCCTH 616/716, OCCTH 618/718, OCCTH 619/719, OCCTH 624/724, OCCTH 627/727. Co-requisites: OCCTH 629/729. (2 units theory, 2 units lab)

OCCTH 640L/641L Fieldwork Level II Internship A and B (12 units)

This is the final stage of coursework designed to introduce the student to the full responsibilities of the profession working in the capacity of a practitioner under the supervision of a certified occupational therapist. Students are able to register for their Level II fieldwork only after successful completion of their two years of didactic coursework. A variety of settings are considered. The student will utilize occupational theory for the assessments, treatment interventions, and competency in practice skills. The student completes the fieldwork requirements in two consecutive 6 unit modules. OCCTH 640L must be successfully completed before being eligible to register and complete OCCTH 641L. After the successful completion of the total six months of Fieldwork II, the student is eligible to sit for the national certification exam provided through the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy. Prerequisite: all prior coursework completed. (12 units clinical lab)

OCCTH 642L Post Professional Level III Internship (2 units)

An optional third internship for those individual students who choose to spend an additional three months in a specialty environment such as in pediatrics or hand therapy. This course has an additional fee.

OCCTH 652/652L Advanced Leadership (2.5 units)

This course will prepare the OTD student with advanced skills in leadership development consistent with ACOTE accreditation standards. Emphasis will be on community program development, advocacy (political action) and administrative initiatives in a changing health care environment. In this course the student will identify his or her own personal leadership style, which will serve as a guide in developing a professional development and leadership plan. This course will also provide the student with an understanding of the process to set up occupational therapy services in traditional settings, community-based environments, and in non-traditional settings. Prerequisite: OCCTH 617, OCCTH 628. (1 unit lecture, 1.5 units lab)

OCCTH 701 Integrative Seminar in Occupational Therapy Practices I (1 unit)

This is the first of the three course series that facilitates students' acquisition of clinical and critical reasoning skills necessary for occupational therapy practices. The courses encourage students to develop the critical thinking and knowledge acquisition skills required to develop relevant clinical skills. The courses use problem-based learning (PBL) and actual client contacts to enable students to apply clinical reasoning and sound theory to the occupational therapy process. This introduction course focuses on developing students' personal insight into individual learning preferences, social-cultural experiences and perception, and communication styles. Additionally, this course intends to develop students' observation skills and beginning application of OT concepts.

OCCTH 702 Integrative Seminar in Occupational Therapy Practices II (1 unit)

This is the second of a three-course series that intends to facilitate students’ acquisition of critical thinking and clinical reasoning skills necessary for occupational therapy practices. The courses integrate the knowledge that students have gained in program coursework by applying the acquired OT skills and knowledge to specific and/or general clinical scenarios. The courses use a problem-based learning (PBL) format as the context by infusing high fidelity simulation learning modules in order for students to develop clinical reasoning and sound theoretical bases essential to the work of an occupational therapist. Prerequisites: enrollment in the OTD program and successful completion of first semester OTD coursework.

OCCTH 703 Integrative Seminar in Occupational Therapy Practices III (1 unit)

This is the third of a four course series that facilitate students’ acquisition of critical thinking and clinical reasoning skills necessary for occupational therapy practice. This course integrates students’ knowledge, gained in program coursework, by requiring application of this knowledge to specific and general clinical scenarios. The course uses a problem-based learning (PBL) format by infusing high fidelity simulation learning modules in order for students to develop clinical reasoning and sound theoretical bases essential to the work of an occupational therapist. This course focuses on honing students’ clinical observation and analytical skills necessary for prompt, precise, and accurate assessment of clients in the occupational therapy process. (1 unit lab)

OCCTH 704 Integrative Seminar in Occupational Therapy Practices III (1 unit)

This is the third of a three course series that intends to facilitate students’ acquisition of clinical and critical reasoning skills necessary for occupational therapy practices. The course integrates the knowledge that students have gained in program coursework by applying the acquired OT skills and knowledge to specific and/or general life and clinical scenarios. The course uses a problem-based learning (PBL) format as the context in order for students to develop clinical reasoning and sound theoretical bases essential to the work of an occupational therapist.  Prerequisite: OT 601/701, OT 602/702, OT 624/724, OT 626/726, OT 632/732.

OCTH 705 Cultue and Occupation (1 unit)

This entry-level master (MOT) and doctorate (OTD) course allows the student to investigate how structural forces in our society impact health outcomes beyond individual patient encounters.  Learning is achieved through active participation in individual and group interactions that demonstrate how implicit bias can be countered in clinical interactions.  Through the use of Healthy People 2030, learners will construct a plan to reduce health disparities through structural and social determinants of health lenses.  Co-requisite: OCCTH 601/701 Integrative Seminar I.  (0.5 units lecture, 0.5 units lab)

 

OCCTH 709 Introduction to Professional Documentation (1 unit)

This course provides students an introduction to professional documentation appropriate to the practice needs of the occupational therapist.

OCCTH 710/710L Anatomical & Physiological Basis for Human Occupation (4.5 units)

Structure/function relationships and relevant physiological mechanisms are examined in a detailed study of regional anatomy in the human body. Special emphasis is given to positional relationships of musculoskeletal structures and neurovascular elements; their corresponding functional roles in human activity, and the clinical implications of anatomical dysfunction. (2.5 units lecture, 2 units lab)

OCCTH 711 Foundations of Occupational Therapy Practice (3 units)

Introduction to the profession of occupational therapy, including history, philosophies, frames of reference, organization, standards, and supervision of aides and assistants. Introduction to methods and utilization of professional publication and audiovisual media. Therapeutic intervention will be critically examined with the model of human occupation. (3 units lecture)

OCCTH 712 Theories of Inquiry and Research Methodology (3 units)

Introduction to the philosophy and principles of the research process in the realm of occupational therapy. Includes scientific writing, literature reviews, methods of inquiry, research design, data collection, ethics, informed consent, and clinical reasoning used in field research. (3 units lecture)

OCCTH 713 Introduction to Psychopathology (1 unit)

This course provides the students an introduction to psycho-pathological diagnoses, disease processes, and symptoms and behavioral manifestations that are commonly seen in occupational therapy practice.

OCCTH 715 Scholarly Writing (1 unit)

This is a seminar course focusing on the technical aspects of understanding literature reviews and how to write them. The course will include the design and implementation of a highly focused and/or updated systematic review.  Students will build on what they’ve learned in the introductory research courses to create research questions, and search for, evaluate and synthesize articles into a completed systematic review.  Students will create and present a poster presentation disseminating the results of the systematic review.

OCCTH 716/716L Therapeutic Media, Material, and Processes (2 units)

Laboratory and didactic course in daily living skills evaluation and activity analysis for the physically, psychologically, and cognitively impaired. Emphasis on strategies and media that promote adaptation to disabilities and increase role independence are taught using adaptive equipment, redesigning the environment, exploration of tools, materials, and uniform terminology. (1 unit lecture, 1 unit lab)

OCCTH 717/717L Interprofessional Communication in Healthcare (2 units)

This course allows the student to enhance professional effectiveness through the improvement of communication skills. Learning is achieved through active participation in individual and group interactions that mirror professional practice. (1 unit lecture, 1 unit lab)

OCCTH 718 Functional Neuroscience (3 units)

Review of neuroanatomy and physiology with emphasis on clinical manifestations of peripheral and central nervous system lesions. The anatomical review of blood supply, somatosensory motor systems, special senses, pain mechanisms, and cognitive, perceptual, and nerve pathways.

OCCTH 719 Human Occupation Throughout the Lifespan (3 units)

This course is an exploration of the stages of human development from conception to death with attention to occupational performance, biological, psychological, cognitive, and sociocultural health determinants. Emphasis will be placed on normal development and observation skills.  Co-requisite: OCCTH 711.

OCCTH 720/720L Advanced Research Methods (2 units)

This is an advanced course designed to involve students in further exploration of descriptive and inferential statistics frequently used in quantitative health-related clinical research. Students will explore the design of qualitative studies; critique research design as well as develop appropriate quantitative or qualitative research questions and research designs. In addition, this course will cover how to implement data analysis and interpret research results. Prerequisite: OCCTH 712. (1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab)

OCCTH 721L Introduction to Fieldwork I (3 units)

This course occurs after successful completion of the first year of studies and is intended to enrich didactic coursework through directed observation and participation in selected aspects of the occupational therapy process. This is achieved through a combination of experiential learning activities. Students will be introduced to the fieldwork experience in a clinical setting where they will be supervised by a clinical educator who will guide the student’s observations and level of participation. Students will also participate in simulation based learning in the co-requisite course, Integrative Seminar in Occupational Therapy Practice II, and will use the simulation experience to create an occupational profile, formulate goals, and an intervention plan for the simulated client. An emphasis is placed on developing professional behaviors, observation skills, clinical reasoning, understanding the needs of clients, and applying occupational theory to practice. In addition to the experiential components, this course utilizes a combination of facilitated reflection, discussion, debrief, and written assignments to meet the learning objectives. Prerequisites: All first year coursework. (3 units clinical lab)

OCCTH 722L Guided Research Seminar (1 unit)

Implementation of a study or investigation of a specific treatment strategy or teaching module used in occupational therapy. Prerequisites: OCCTH 712, OCCTH 715. (1 unit lab)

OCCTH 723 Capstone Exploration (2 units)

This is the first of a four course sequence that is designed as a guided progressive process to engage the student in developing advanced skills and knowledge in occupational therapy through a doctoral capstone experience and project. The advanced experience and project may be in one or more of the following areas: clinical practice skills, research skills, administration, leadership, program and policy development, advocacy, education, or theory development. In this course, under the guidance of an instructor, the student will explore areas of potential interest that would lead to a final in-depth experiential project to be executed in the final semester of the OTD program. Through a combination of systematic approaches appropriate to each project, such as literature review, clinical visits, mentoring, critical review of evidence, a feasibility study, needs assessment, group discussion, and self-reflection, the student will solidify an area of interest to be further developed into a capstone experience and project.

OCCTH 726/726L Theory and Practice in Psychosocial Dysfunction (4 units)

The course includes instruction in evaluation methods, social and psychological theories, and pharmacologic intervention strategies for persons experiencing psychosocial dysfunction. There is a focus on group process, self-esteem, stress management, and the use of purposeful activities for this population. An exploration of acute and chronic substance abuse and social issues is included. The clinical component of this course will allow students to provide group and individual treatment to individuals who have co-occurring disorders in an area outpatient clinic.  Prerequisite: OCCTH 711, OCCTH 716, OCCTH 713, OCCTH 719.  (3 lecture, 1 lab)

OCCTH 727/727L Applied Kinesiology and Biomechanics (4 units)

Analysis of human movement during occupations utilizing biomechanical principles. Laboratory experiences include manual testing, joint range of motion measurement, and kinesiological activity analysis. Osteokinematic as well as arthrokinematic concepts and abnormal movement patterns will be examined. (3 units lecture, 1 unit lab)

OCCTH 728 Administration and Management (3 units)

Administration and organization of occupational therapy services within the current and future health care environment. Emphasis on consultation, quality assurance, program evaluation, functional outcome assessment, program evaluation, strategic planning, marketing, and budgeting in community-based services. Health care reform and third-party reimbursement issues are examined. Lab experiences will be incorporated within each class. Prerequisite: OCCTH 723.

OCCTH 729/729L Theory and Practice in Physical Dysfunction (4 units)

Methods of evaluation, treatment planning, and implementation of interventions to address functional limitations due to physical dysfunction are presented in this course. Emphasis is placed on sensorimotor, cognitive, biomechanical, and neurodevelopmental treatment techniques. Biopsychosocial and mind-body considerations will be included in therapeutic intervention strategies. Inclass discussion and assignments will facilitate the clinical reasoning process, problem-solving, therapeutic application of interventions, and goal setting within the occupational therapy practice framework. The lab component provides hands-on learning of practical skills. Prerequisites: OCCTH 711, OCCTH 712, OCCTH 716, OCCTH 724, OCCTH 725, OCCTH 727, OCCTH 732/732L. Co-requisites: OCCTH 731, OCCTH 736. (3 units lecture, 1 units lab)

OCCTH 730 Research Synthesis Project (1 unit)

This course focuses on the successful completion of a synthesis project or a scholarly work which shows evidence of academic rigor, scientific inquiry, critical reasoning, creativity and/or clinical expertise. Prerequisites: OCCTH 712, OCCTH 715, OCCTH 722L, OCCTH 720.

OCCTH 731 Occupational Adaptations & Introduction to Modalities (3 units)

An introduction to a variety of technologies used in the practice of occupational therapy. Evaluative, assistive, and adaptive equipment used to facilitate the occupational performance areas are discussed and demonstrated. Medical devices and procedures used in medical care and nursing are also investigated to prepare students for treating patients with a variety of medical conditions.  Ergonomics, accessibility and physical agent modalities are introduced. Prerequisites: OCCTH 710, OCCTH 711, OCCTH 716, OCCTH 718, OCCTH 724, OCCTH, 725 OCCTH 727. Corequisites: OCCTH 729, OCCTH 736. (2 units lecture, 1 unit lab)

OCCTH 732/732L Advanced Clinical Practice (Children) (4 units)

Clinical experience to learn screening and assessment of conditions affecting children. Students will learn how to evaluate, develop treatment plans, provide intervention and discharge planning for children with physical, psychosocial, neurological and sensory integrative delays. Labs will consist of evaluation and treatment of pediatric clients in the OT Participant Lab. Prerequisites: OCCTH 710, OCCTH 711, OCCTH 712, OCCTH 716, OCCTH 717, OCCTH 718, OCCTH 719, OCCTH 725, OCCTH 727. Corequisite: OCCTH 724 (2 units theory,1 units lab)

OCCTH 733 Health Promotion and Wellness (2 units)

A critical review of traditional and non-traditional systems of health care based on available evidence with an emphasis on health promotion and wellness. Various types of interventions will be discussed to manage health in the workplace, chronic pain and conditions caused by stress. In addition to manual therapies, mindfulness practice, self-reflection and complementary therapies will be demonstrated through “hands-on” experiences. Prerequisites: Anatomy and Physiology. Corequisite: Neuroscience.

OCCTH 735/735L Capstone Development (2 units)

This is the second of a five course sequence designed as a guided progressive process to engage the student in solidifying a project proposal/plan for the capstone project. In this course, under the guidance of an instructor, the student will complete the planning stage of the capstone project and secure a community site and a content expert/mentor in the community for the final capstone project to take place. This second course focuses on developing advanced knowledge and skill in designing, implementing, and evaluating an individual capstone project plan ready to be implemented in the last two semesters. (1 unit lecture, 1 unit lab) Prerequisite: OCCTH 723

OCCTH 736/736L Advanced Clinical Practice (Adults) (4 units)

This combined lecture and lab course provides students with advanced knowledge and skills for serving adults who have physical disabilities, primarily from neurological traumas and/or ailments. The critical skills of clinical reasoning, observation, and administration and interpretation of assessments are specifically emphasized. Students’ competence in addressing the social and cultural issues pertaining to occupations is also underscored. In the lab, students will execute the occupational therapy process with an assigned adult participant within the Community Participant Lab, guided by licensed occupational therapists and instructors. Prerequisites: OCCTH 610/710, OCCTH 611/711, OCCTH 612/712, OCCTH 616/716, OCCTH 618/718, OCCTH 619/719, OCCTH 624/724, OCCTH 627/727. Co-requisites: OCCTH 629/729. (2 units theory, 2 units lab)

OCCTH 740/741 Fieldwork Level II Internship A and B (12 units)

This is the final stage of coursework designed to introduce the student to the full responsibilities of the profession working in the capacity of a practitioner under the supervision of a certified occupational therapist. Students are able to register for their Level II fieldwork only after successful completion of their two years of didactic coursework. A variety of settings are considered. The student will utilize occupational theory for the assessments, treatment interventions, and competency in practice skills. The student completes the fieldwork requirements in two consecutive 6 unit modules. OCCTH 740L must be successfully completed before being eligible to register and complete OCCTH 741L. After the successful completion of the total six months of Fieldwork II, the student is eligible to sit for the national certification exam provided through the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy. Prerequisite: all prior coursework completed. (12 units clinical lab)

OCCTH 747 Adv. Focus- Entrepreneurship in Pediatrics (2 units)

Students will investigate a specific topic or population of interest in pediatric occupational therapy and develop a program to meet the needs of their chosen population. Students will apply knowledge of OT theory and frameworks and combine this knowledge with current best-practices in business/program development by designing a unique pediatric program related to a specific population (including: feasibility and needs assessment, analysis of competition, mission and values statement, and implementation timeline). Students will learn how to systematize workflow and market their programs, explore and use free technology tools to organize their work, and apply copywriting skills and design principles to create effective print and online marketing materials to illustrate the unique value of their pediatric OT program to the community. Prerequisite: All coursework in first 2 years of program, plus successful completion of Level 2 Fieldwork.

GENED 748 Neuromechanical Bases of Posture, Balance, and Gait (2 units)

Students in this course will investigate the neurological, biomechanical, and motor control aspects of three fundamental human movement skills: posture, balance, and gait. Emphasis will be placed on understanding how sensorimotor integration occurs in healthy individuals during these tasks, and how dysfunctions typically manifest themselves. Students will spend the majority of class time in hands-on sessions in the Motion Analysis Research Center working in interdisciplinary teams to learn how to apply research tools and techniques to answer clinical questions related to posture, balance, and gait. In addition, students will be encouraged to explore ways to translate what they learn in this course to real-life, clinic-based situations. Prerequisites: OCCTH 627/627L or OCCTH 727/727L 

OCCTH 752/752L Advanced Leadership Seminar (2.5 units)

This course will prepare the OTD student with advanced skills in leadership development consistent with ACOTE accreditation standards. Emphasis will be on community program development, advocacy (political action) and administrative initiatives in a changing health care environment. In this course the student will identify his or her own personal leadership style, which will serve as a guide in developing a professional development and leadership plan. This course will also provide the student with an understanding of the process to set up occupational therapy services in traditional settings, community-based environments, and in non-traditional settings. Prerequisite: OCCTH 717, OCCTH 728. (1 unit lecture, 1.5 units lab)

OCCTH 754 Capstone Implementation (6 units)

This is the third of a four course sequence designed as a guided progressive process to engage the student in developing advanced skills and/or knowledge in occupational therapy through a capstone experience and project. This is the full implementation of the capstone, which is individualized with intensive immersion into the area of occupational therapy practice with which the student has explored, identified, developed, planned, and received approval for in previous semesters. Guided by a designated faculty member as an internal mentor and a content expert as an external mentor, students implement their pre-authorized and planned capstone experience and project based on their individual focus in the areas of clinical practice skills, research skills, administration, leadership, program and policy development, advocacy, education, or theory development. Prerequisite: Enrollment in OTD program Successful completion of first two years of OTD program including Fieldwork (no competence) OT 723, 735, (no OT 750)

OCCTH 755 Capstone Report (3 units)

This is the last of a four course sequence designed as a guided progressive process to engage the student in developing advanced skills and/or knowledge in occupational therapy through a capstone experience and project. In conclusion of the full implementation of the capstone experience and project, students are expected to submit a full report documenting the entire capstone process. Students follow the pre-established report guideline to compose this scholarly report. Additionally, students will disseminate the report to relevant stakeholders and professional communities through well-considered means, guided by a designated faculty member. Prerequisite: Successful completion of first two years of OTD program including Fieldwork including OT723, 735.  Co-requisite: OT 754

PHYTH 701 Capstone I: Introduction (.25 unit)

This is the first in a four-course sequence that terminates in the development and presentation of a student Capstone Project. This course introduces the students to the various capstone pathways to allow the students to gain foundational information to prepare them to select one pathway to pursue for the remainder of the sequence by the end of the summer Year 1 of the program. Prerequisite: Successful completion of courses taken during terms 1-2 of the DPT program. (.25 hours lecture)

PHYTH 702 Capstone II: Exploration and Planning (.75 unit)

This is the second in a four-course sequence that terminates in the development and presentation of a student Capstone Project. This course builds upon the concepts learned in PHYTH 701 Capstone I: Introduction. In this course, students will further explore their selected capstone pathway. Students will read and critique relevant examples of literature in their selected capstone pathway. Students will work closely with their Capstone Faculty to develop a comprehensive plan for implementing their selected capstone project. Prerequisite: PHYTH 701. (.75 hours seminar)

PHYTH 703 Capstone III: Implementation (1 unit)

This is the third in a four-course sequence that terminates in the development and presentation of a student Capstone Project. This course builds upon the concepts learned in PHYTH 701 Capstone I: Introduction and PHYTH 702: Capstone II: Exploration and Planning. In this course, students will further explore their selected capstone pathway and will implement their capstone project plan for their respective pathway. Students will collect the appropriate data, compile and analyze the data collected, including a relevant literature search for their selected capstone pathway. Prerequisites: PHYTH 701 and PHYTH 702. (1.0 hours seminar)

PHYTH 704 Capstone IV: Completion (2 units)

This is the fourth and final in a four-course sequence that terminates in the development and presentation of a student Capstone Project. This course builds upon the concepts learned in PHYTH 701 Capstone I: Introduction, PHYTH 702 Capstone II: Exploration and Planning, and PHYTH 703 Capstone III: Implementation. In this course, students will complete their selected capstone project including submission of a final manuscript and a formal presentation of their project. The manuscript and related presentation require students to: conduct a comprehensive literature search; evaluate the process, outcome and impact of their project; and perform an in-depth critical self-reflection of their performance and learning throughout the capstone project. Prerequisites: PHYTH 701, PHYTH 702, and PHYTH 703. (2.0 hours seminar)

PHYTH 705 Patient/Client Management: Complexity in Care (2 units)

This course focuses on physical therapist patient/client management under complex conditions, including contextual characteristics of the type of care setting, the physical environment, the interprofessional care team, and patient/client personal factors and their interactions. Successful patient/client management requires that the practitioner perform and integrate clinical reasoning and decision-making in conjunction with clinical skill performance during fast-paced, rapidly-changing, contextually-complex situations; respond appropriately and in real time to emerging information; and demonstrate cognitive flexibility. Laboratory and simulation activities will be used to create complex clinical scenarios that are systematically increased in difficulty across the term. A focus on safety—of both the patient/client and the practitioner—including the ability to communicate effectively in the moment is interwoven. Methods of assessment include individual performance, self-reflection, and peer assessment. Prerequisite: Successful completion of courses taken in terms 1-4. (1.0 hour lecture, 3 hours lab)

PHYTH 706 Pro bono Experiences (2 units)

Pro bono experiences is one course, divided into 4 parts distributed over 4 academic terms throughout the curriculum. This course provides students with the opportunity to work collaboratively with peers and faculty to provide pro bono services, including examination, evaluation, development and administration of a plan of care, and assessment of outcomes, for community participants from underserved populations. Students will integrate current best evidence into their practice with community participants, and will engage in making appropriate referrals to other community service providers or health care professionals. Students also learn to work with participants in groups or class settings to provide mobility-based and education-based interventions to address existing movement and pain-related dysfunctions and to provide injury prevention and health promotion services. Practice opportunities for professional communication and presentations are also included. Prerequisites: Successful completion of the Patient/Client Management courses offered in the preceding and concurrent terms. (15 hours lecture, 45 hours lab, spread over terms 1, 3, 5, and 7)

PHYTH 710 Clinical Foundations in Physical Therapy (3 units)

This course introduces fundamental skills used throughout physical therapy practice and among practice settings. Theoretical concepts of enablement/disablement, disease, and management of the patient/client in physical therapy will serve as the basis of the course, including an introduction to clinical reasoning strategies. Basic patient history, physical examination, and interventions will be introduced, including therapeutic exercise, functional mobility and gait, with an emphasis on patient and therapist safety. Introduction to patient/client management in an inpatient setting will be used to synthesize information over the course. A framework for documentation will be incorporated throughout the course. (1.5 hours lecture, 4.5 hours lab)

PHYTH 711 Patient/Client Management: Musculoskeletal I (5 units)

This course focuses on physical therapist patient/client management of simple musculoskeletal movement impairments and functional limitations in the lower extremities and lumbar spine in persons across the lifespan. Procedural interventions of lower extremity orthotics and taping will be included. Prerequisite: Successful completion of courses taken during term 1. (3 hours lecture, 6 hours lab)

PHYTH 712 Patient/Client Management: Musculoskeletal II (5 units)

This course focuses on physical therapist patient/client management of simple musculoskeletal impairments and functional limitations in the upper extremities and cervical/thoracic spine in persons across the lifespan. Prerequisite: Successful completion of courses taken in terms 1 and 2. (3 hours lecture, 6 hours lab)

PHYTH 713 Patient/Client Management: Neuromuscular I (5 units)

This course focuses on physical therapist management of patients/clients with neuromuscular impairments and functional limitations. Patient problems that include musculoskeletal dysfunction and special problems of some representative neurological disorders of adults will be included. Prerequisite: Successful completion of courses taken in terms 1-4. (3 hours lecture, 6 hours lab)

PHYTH 714 Patient/Client Management: Pediatrics (3 units)

This course focuses on the study of normal growth and development of humans from birth to adolescence, and the common pathological conditions encountered by physical therapists, whether in a pediatric or general PT practice, when managing the pediatric patient population. The Physical Therapist Patient Client Management Model is applied to the pediatric patient population. Specialized skills and knowledge relative to equipment, funding issues, and delivery systems pertinent to pediatrics are reviewed. Interwoven throughout the course is the impact of childhood disability on the family unit. Prerequisite: Successful completion of courses taken in terms 1-4. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)

PHYTH 715A Patient/Client Management: Special Topics I (1.5 units)

Requiring the integration of material from past and current courses, this course focuses on the physical therapy evaluation and management of a more complex patient/client population. Students will learn to perform an examination (interview, physical examination tests and measures, systems review and review of systems), evaluate the data from the examination to formulate a diagnosis, prognosis and plan of care. Additionally, students will learn to choose and perform appropriate interventions which may include coordination and communication with other health care providers, patient/client-related instruction and procedural interventions. This course is divided into two portions. This first portion is for those patients/clients with interrelated impairments and activity limitations/participation restrictions associated with amputation and integumentary integrity (specifically wounds). Prerequisites: Successful completion of courses taken in terms 1-4. (1 hour lecture, 1.5 hours lab)

PHYTH 715B Patient/Client Management: Special Topics II (1.5 units)

Requiring the integration of material from past and current courses, this course focuses on the physical therapy evaluation and management of a more complex patient/client population. Students will learn to perform an examination (interview, physical examination tests and measures, systems review and review of systems), evaluate the data from the examination to formulate a diagnosis, prognosis, and plan of care. Additionally, students will learn to choose and perform appropriate interventions which may include coordination and communication with other health care providers, patient/client-related instruction and procedural interventions. This course is divided into two portions. This second portion is for those patients/clients with inter-related impairments and activity limitations/participation restrictions associated with obesity, aging (geriatrics), oncological disease, integumentary integrity (specifically burns), diabetes mellitus, and gender-related health issues including pregnancy, incontinence, osteoporosis and pelvic pain. In addition, aspects related to health and wellness and health disparities affecting these special populations will be discussed. Students will use evidence-based decision making throughout this course. In addition, the principles of case management of special populations will be explored. Prerequisites: Successful completion of courses taken in terms 1-4. (1 hour lecture, 1.5 hours lab)

PHYTH 716 Patient/Client Management: Musculoskeletal III (3 units)

Requiring the integration of material from past and current courses, this course focuses on physical therapist patient/client management of musculoskeletal impairments and functional limitations involving complex, multi-regional, multisystem involvement. This course focuses on the refinement and development of the entry-level student’s clinical reasoning, critical thinking, and clinical decision-making applied to these patients and populations. There is also an emphasis on the development of fluid, proficient psychomotor skills used in physical therapy patient management for the patient with a musculoskeletal disorder. Students will critically evaluate and choose among varying sources of evidence in clinical decision-making throughout this course. This course includes more in-depth coverage of physical therapy evaluation and management of patients with upper quarter and lower quarter involvement, including the spine and chronic pain. Prerequisites: Successful completion of courses taken in terms 1-6. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)

PHYTH 717 Patient/Client Management: Cardiopulmonary (3 units)

This course focuses on physical therapist management of patients/clients with complex impairments and functional limitations associated with the cardiopulmonary system across the lifespan. Students will use evidence-based decision making throughout this course. Prerequisites: Successful completion of courses taken in terms 1-5. (2.5 hours lecture, 1.5 hours lab)

PHYTH 718 Patient/Client Management: Neuromuscular II (3 units)

This course focuses on physical therapist patient/client management of neuromuscular impairments and functional limitations involving complex, multi-regional, and multisystem involvement in persons across the life span. Learning activities emphasize the refinement and development of the entry-level student’s clinical reasoning, critical thinking, and clinical decision-making applied to these patients and populations. Prerequisites: Successful completion of courses taken in terms 1-6. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)

PHYTH 719 Physical Agents and Electrotherapy (1 unit)

This course will enable the student to use clinical reasoning to properly select and safely and competently apply the various physical and electrotherapeutic modalities used by physical therapists. The course will also teach the student to appropriately instruct supportive personnel on the use of these modalities and to instruct patients and families in the correct use of these modalities in the home setting. Topics covered will include physiological responses, uses, limitations, indications, contraindications and precautions for use of each modality. In addition to practice in performance of examination and treatment procedures related to the use of physical agents and electrotherapeutic modalities, lab activities will incorporate correct body mechanics, positioning and draping and documentation. Prerequisites: Successful completion of PHYTH 710, PHYTH 722, PHYTH 732. (0.5 hours lecture, 1.5 hours lab)

PHYTH 722 Clinical Physiology (3.5 units)

This course is an in depth study of physiology of the musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, blood and lymphatic, pulmonary, renal, endocrine, autonomic, immune, metabolic systems and digestive systems. Energetics, basic nutrition and metabolism will be covered. Physiologic aging and effects of immobilization will also be studied. Lecture/laboratory sessions and case studies will be used to study, measure, evaluate and interpret normal and abnormal physiologic responses. (3.1 hours lecture, 0.9 hours lab)

PHYTH 723 Gross Anatomy I (3 units)

This course is the first of two devoted to the study of regional gross structure of the human body. This course covers the lower extremity, lumbar and thoracic spine, thorax, abdomen, pelvis and perineum. The emphasis is on anatomy relevant to clinical practice in physical therapy, with emphasis on the skeletal, muscular, vascular and neurological systems. Basic embryology is included and histology is introduced. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)

PHYTH 724 Functional Anatomy, Biomechanics and Kinesiology I (3 units)

This course is the first of two devoted to the application of anatomy, biomechanics and kinesiology to movement disorders of the lumbar spine and lower quarter. The emphasis is on the relationship between structure and function of the systems involved in movement and the implications of pathologies and impairments that affect movement. There is significant laboratory time in which the student applies concepts of kinesiology and biomechanics to problems associated with movement and analyzes movement using these concepts. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)

PHYTH 725 Gross Anatomy II (2 units)

This is the second of two courses devoted to the study of regional gross structure and function of the human body. This semester covers the superficial back, upper extremity, head and neck. The emphasis is on anatomy relevant to clinical practice in physical therapy, with emphasis on the skeletal, muscular, vascular and neurological systems. Development of the head, neck, brain and spinal cord will also be covered. Prerequisite: Successful completion of PHYTH 723. (1.25 hours lecture, 2.25 hours lab)

PHYTH 726 Functional Anatomy, Biomechanics and Kinesiology II (3 units)

This course is the second of two courses devoted to the application of anatomy, biomechanics and kinesiology to movement disorders of the cervical spine and upper quarter. The emphasis is on the relationship between structure and function of the systems involved in movement and the implications of pathologies and impairments that affect movement. There is significant laboratory time in which the student applies concepts of kinesiology and biomechanics to problems associated with movement and analyzes movement using these concepts. Page 105 Abnormal gait analysis is included. Prerequisites: Successful completion of PHYTH 723, PHYTH 724. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours lab)

PHYTH 727 Neuroscience I (1 unit)

This course is the first of a three-course sequence devoted to the study of the structure and function of the human nervous system. The emphasis of this course is on 1) the basic gross structure of the central nervous system; 2) histology and functions of neurons and neuroglia; 3) physiology of excitable membranes, synapses, basic sensory physiology, and spinal cord reflexes. (1 hour lecture)

PHYTH 728 Neuroscience II (2 units)

This is the second of a three-course sequence devoted to the study of the structure and function of the human nervous system. The emphasis of this course is on: the gross and intrinsic structure of the central nervous system., somatosensory and motor and cranial nerve pathways structure and function, and identification of lesion sites along the neuraxis and description of patient signs or symptoms. Prerequisites: Successful completion of PHYTH 723, PHYTH 724, PHYTH 727. (2 hours lecture)

PHYTH 729 Neuroscience III (3 units)

This is the last of a three-course sequence devoted to the study of the structure and function of the human nervous system. The emphasis of this course is an in-depth study of the physiology of the nervous system that control human movement. Students will apply this information to understand physical therapy examination, evaluation, diagnosis, prognosis, plan of care, and intervention for people with impairments and functional limitations of the nervous system. Course content will be integrated with PHYTH 713, PHYTH 734, and PHYTH 753. Prerequisites: Successful completion of courses taken in terms 1-4. (3 hours lecture)

PHYTH 730 Medical Screening for the Physical Therapist (.5 unit)

An important element of physical therapist practice is the recognition of clinical red flags that may suggest physician referral is warranted. This course will help prepare the student to assume the role of an interdependent practitioner working within a collaborative medical model. The components of medical screening, namely identification of health risk factors, recognitions atypical symptoms/signs, and review of systems, will be covered through lecture and laboratory sessions. A proposed examination scheme designed to promote efficient and effective collection of patient data will also provide the structure for laboratory sessions. Professional communication with patients and physicians/physician extenders will also be a central theme throughout the course. Prerequisites: Successful completion of courses taken in terms 1-4. (0.5 hours lecture)

PHYTH 732 Pathology and Pharmacology I (2 units)

This is the first of a three-course sequence discussing pathology, pharmacology, and medical management of disease as foundational to understanding physical therapy intervention. Concept of injury, inflammation and stages of healing will be discussed. Pathology and medical management associated with the rheumatologic, immune system, infections, oncology, the integumentary system, endocrine and metabolic systems, and cardiac systems will be examined. Prerequisite: PHYTH 722. (2 hours lecture)

PHYTH 733 Pathology and Pharmacology II (1.5 units)

This is the second of a three-course sequence discussing pathology, pharmacology and medical management of disease as foundational to understanding physical therapy examination and intervention. Pathology and medical management associated with the vascular, pulmonary, hepatobiliary, renal and urinary, hematologic, lymphatic, reproductive systems and musculoskeletal neoplasms will be examined. Prerequisite: PHYTH 732. (1.5 hours lecture)

PHYTH 734 Pathology and Medical Management in Neurology (2 units)

Focusing on the etiology, pathology, diagnosis, medical management, clinical presentation and prognosis of diseases and disorders of the peripheral and central nervous system and neuromuscular diseases, this course explores medical management including pharmacology, surgical interventions and referral to other health care professionals. Prerequisites: PHYTH 722, PHYTH 732, PHYTH 733. (2 hours lecture)

PHYTH 735 Exercise Prescription for Patients and Clients I (1 unit)

This course is the first in a three-course series designed to cover the concepts of exercise and therapeutic exercise as applied to different conditions and patient populations. This particular course focuses on the introduction of exercise and therapeutic exercise and application of theories and techniques of exercise intervention in patients and clients with movement dysfunctions. An introductory discussion of motor control and motor learning concepts will give the students the necessary foundation for making appropriate clinical decisions when providing interventions. This course will also include content on home exercise program prescription and discuss facilitators to maximize patient adherence. Students will be encouraged to discuss and build upon their knowledge of basic therapeutic techniques attained from previous volunteer or work experiences. (0.5 hours lecture, 1.5 hours lab)

PHYTH 736 Exercise Prescription for Patients and Clients II (1 unit)

This course is the second in a three-course series designed to cover principles and concepts of exercise prescription as applied to different conditions and patient/client populations. This course focuses on the application of foundational knowledge of exercise learned in the preceding introductory exercise prescription course to patients and clients with participation restrictions and/or activity limitations related primarily to impairments of the musculoskeletal system. Students will gain experience and practice in integrating the cognitive and psychomotor skills required to develop, administer, and progress therapeutic exercise for patients/clients with various symptomatic musculoskeletal conditions, underlying pathological musculoskeletal conditions, in the context of pre-and post-operative situations, work-related injuries, and with older adults. Students will learn how to use a model of movement analysis and apply concepts of motor control and motor learning in the analysis of functional activities to provide a foundation for both neuromuscular re-education intervention planning and to serve as a foundation from which to generate hypotheses about potentially related impairments that may be appropriately addressed through therapeutic exercise interventions. Students will gain experience in reasoning through situations where the focus of intervention is addressing impairments in static posture, balance, flexibility, muscle performance (strength, power, endurance), and situations where it is appropriate to integrate concepts of wellness, health promotion, and disease/injury prevention. The course will explicitly reinforce a collaborative, patient-centered approach to health care, with examples of ways in which personal and environmental factors (including culture/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, literacy, and psychological factors) are factored into clinical reasoning in the context of exercise prescription. Prerequisites: Successful completion of courses taken in terms 1-2. (0.5 hours lecture, 1.5 hours lab)

PHYTH 737 Exercise Prescription for Patients and Clients III (1 unit)

This course is the third in a three-course series designed to cover the concepts of therapeutic exercise as applied to different conditions and patient/client populations. This particular course focuses on the application of theories and techniques of therapeutic exercise in patients and clients with movement dysfunctions secondary to neuromuscular conditions, and in pediatric populations. An in-depth analysis and discussion of motor control and motor learning concepts as applicable to the above-mentioned populations will give the students the necessary foundation for making appropriate clinical decisions when providing interventions. This course will also include content on postural control, coordination and neuromuscular reeducation. Students will be encouraged to discuss and build upon their knowledge of basic therapeutic techniques attained from previous coursework and clinical training experiences. Prerequisites: Successful completion of courses taken in terms 1-4. (0.5 hours lecture, 1.5 hours lab)

PHYTH 738 Musculoskeletal Medical Management and Imaging I (1.5 units)

This is the first of a two-course sequence that covers medical management and medical imaging of musculoskeletal-related pathologies or conditions affecting the lumbar spine and lower extremities. This course will cover basic concepts of medical imaging, routine and special views of the spine and lower extremities, and selection of the most appropriate imaging modality given a particular patient/client presentation. This course will also cover basic information concerning sprains, strains and fractures as well as clinical signs and symptoms, differential diagnosis, etiology, incidence, prevalence and basic medical management for common musculoskeletal pathologies of the lumbar spine and SIJ region, hip, knee and ankle foot regions. The intent of this course is to provide the foundations for understanding the physical therapy patient/client management of these conditions. Prerequisites: PHYTH 722, PHYTH 723, PHYTH 724, PHYTH 727. (1.25 hours lecture, 0.75 hours lab)

PHYTH 739 Musculoskeletal Medical Management and Imaging II (1.5 units)

This is the second of a two-course sequence that covers medical management and medical imaging of musculoskeletal-related pathologies or conditions affecting the cervical and thoracic spine, temporomandibular joint and the upper extremities. This course will cover basic concepts of medical imaging, routine and special views of the cervical and thoracic spine, temporomandibular joint and the upper extremities, and selection of the most appropriate imaging modality given a particular patient/client presentation. This course will also cover clinical signs and symptoms, etiology, incidence, prevalence and basic medical management for common musculoskeletal pathologies of the cervical and thoracic spine, temporomandibular joint, shoulder, elbow, wrist and hand. The intent of this course is to provide the foundations for understanding the physical therapy patient/client management of these conditions. Prerequisite: PHYTH 738. (1.25 hours lecture, 0.75 hours lab)

PHYTH 741 Professional Issues I (1 unit)

This course covers the professional, legal, and ethical foundations of physical therapy practice, including a historic perspective on the development of the profession and current and future trends in practice. (1 hour seminar)

PHYTH 742 Teaching and Learning (1.5 units)

This course explores effective teaching and learning in physical therapy practice and education. Students gain a foundation in the evidence on learning, particularly related to clinical practice and the work of health care practitioners. Students apply that evidence to (1) individuals and groups including patient(s)/client(s) with varying levels of literacy; (2) clinical learning and teaching, including as clinical instructors and as student physical therapists; (3) learning in the workplace for professional development; (4) and teaching other clinicians and the public. This course supports the student becoming a critically self-reflective practitioner within the clinical reasoning framework that is integrated throughout the curriculum.

PHYTH 743 Interprofessional and Intrapersonal Communication in Health Care (2 units)

This course allows the student to enhance professional effectiveness through the improvement of communication skills. Learning is achieved through active participation in individual and group interactions that mirror professional practice. (1 hour lecture, 3 hours lab)

PHYTH 744 Health Care Systems and Regulatory Aspects of Physical Therapy (2 units)

This course addresses how the design of the American health care system and the regulation of practice affect physical therapy practice. Students learn how they can successfully adapt and respond to a dynamic health care system in which change is a constant. (2 hours lecture)

PHYTH 745 Behavioral and Psychosocial Factors in Health Care (2 units)

This course covers behavioral and psychosocial factors in healthcare and explores scope-of-practice issues related to mental health. Content includes models of therapeutic communication to develop the therapeutic relationship and evidence-based approaches to facilitate health behavior change, including selected health behavior theories and models. Content also includes screening and outcome measures for behavioral, psychosocial, and mental health factors that relate to physical therapist practice. The course focuses on applications of these tools to optimize the physical therapist patient/client management process in those with mental health considerations and intersectionality with personal and environmental factors that impact movement, activity, participation, and health. Prerequisite: PHYTH 743.

PHYTH 746 Management of Physical Therapy Services (2 units)

Students study leadership and management of physical therapy service delivery. Principles of management as applied to physical therapy, including organizational behavior, resource planning and management, program planning, financial planning, marketing, personnel direction and management, quality management, risk management, and legal and ethical issues are explored. Units on contracting, consulting, health maintenance organizations, and Medicare and Medicaid requirements are included. The concept of a physical therapist as an autonomous practitioner will be discussed in this course. (2 hours lecture)

PHYTH 747 Professional Issues II (1 unit)

This course addresses professional ethics, including ethical reasoning, moral agency, and moral courage based on the authentic experiences of students during clinical experiences. The course also addresses current issues affecting the profession of physical therapy. In both ethics and current issues, the importance of advocacy and leadership are addressed. The course concludes with planning for the transition into the profession and career from an individual and collective perspective. Prerequisites: Successful completion of courses taken in terms 1-4. (1 hour lecture)

GENED 748 Neuromechanical Bases of Posture, Balance, and Gait (2 units)

Students in this course will investigate the neurological, biomechanical, and motor control aspects of three fundamental human movement skills: posture, balance, and gait. Emphasis will be placed on understanding how sensorimotor integration occurs in healthy individuals during these tasks, and how dysfunctions typically manifest themselves. Students will spend the majority of class time in hands-on sessions in the Motion Analysis Research Center working in interdisciplinary teams to learn how to apply research tools and techniques to answer clinical questions related to posture, balance, and gait. In addition, students will be encouraged to explore ways to translate what they learn in this course to real-life, clinic-based situations.  Prerequisite: PHYTH 724

PHYTH 755 Evidence-Based Practice I (2 units)

The two term evidence-based practice sequence is designed to prepare the student to be a competent consumer of research and a knowledgeable participant in clinical research. This first course is designed to introduce students to the basic principles of the scientific method and prepare them to analyze research studies critically. Focus will be on the role of research, methodologies, sampling, levels of measurement, probability, hypothesis testing, reliability and validity, and standard error. Students will be prepared to critique articles in the literature. (2 hours lecture)

PHYTH 756 Evidence-Based Practice II (2 units)

The two term evidence-based practice sequence is designed to prepare the student to be a competent consumer of research and a knowledgeable participant in clinical research. This second course is designed to give students practical experience with data collection, input, analysis, and documentation. Focus will be on how to design a research project, ethical conduct in science, and tests of significance such as ANOVA, correlation, and regression. Students will develop hypotheses and research questions, and continue to critique literature, particularly related to development of clinical practice guidelines. Prerequisite: Successful completion of PHYTH 755. (2 hours lecture)

PHYTH 761 Integrated Clinical Experience (0.5 unit)

PHYTH 761 is a hybrid clinical and simulation lab course designed to immerse students for one week in the inpatient management of patients through supervised, clinical observations and active use of behaviors and skills learned in the first trimester of the program. Supervised clinical observations in the inpatient setting, both with physical therapists and with other members of the interprofessional team, aim to provide a holistic context of the health care team's role in the inpatient setting as well as provide for observation of the physical therapist's management of inpatients. Simulation experiences, augmented by guided assignments and debriefings, will provide students the opportunity to practice elements of patient/client management for an individual with a single or simple movement dysfunction, including chart review, patient interview, examination, intervention, and individualized exercise prescription. Students will be expected to demonstrate professionalism, adherence to infection control and privacy regulations, and appropriate communication during all components of this course.

PHYTH 763 Clinical Experience I (5 units)

Experiential learning in clinical settings with the primary emphasis on the physical therapy patient/client management process for persons with musculoskeletal dysfunctions. This is a full-time, ten-week clinical experience. Prerequisites: Successful completion of courses taken during terms 1-3.

PHYTH 765 Clinical Experience II (5 units)

Experiential learning in clinical settings with the primary emphasis on the physical therapy patient/client management process for persons with neuromuscular dysfunctions with the adult and/or pediatric population. This is a full-time, ten-week clinical experience. Prerequisites: Successful completion of courses taken during terms 1-5.

PHYTH 766 Final Clinical Experience (no credit assigned)

The final clinical experience is a full- time, sixteen-week clinical experience following successful completion of the academic portion of professional program. During the final clinical experience, the student will fully integrate her/his their academic and prior clinical experiences to achieve the transition from student to independent entry level practitioner capable of practicing in a direct access environment. The student will have the opportunity to exhibit competence in all aspects of physical therapy patient management for a variety of patients with movement related impairments, functional limitations, and disabilities typically seen in PT practice. In addition, they will achieve competence as practitioners on interdisciplinary teams and effective participants in the healthcare delivery system. Prerequisites: Successful completion of courses taken during terms 1-7.

ELECTIVES PHYTH 781 Advanced Pediatrics (2 units)

This course focuses on physical therapist patient/client management of complex multisystem involvement in the pediatric population. The use of evidence-based practice, including standardized pediatric tests and measures to guide decision-making, is emphasized throughout the course. (2 hours lecture)

PHYTH 782 Physical Therapy in Sports Medicine (2 units)

This course focuses on physical therapist management of patients/clients with sports-related musculoskeletal impairments and functional limitations. Knowledge of anatomy, biomechanics, exercise, and rehabilitation principles is applied along with clinical reasoning processes to this patient population. Prerequisite: DPT III status. (2 hours lecture)

PA 601/601L Human Gross Anatomy (5 units)

This one-semester course is designed to familiarize the student with the clinically relevant aspects of human anatomy with an in-depth examination of anatomical structure and function. Emphasis is placed on relationship of structure and normal variants with clinical correlation to pathology and disease presentation. The course includes an embryology component to aid students in understanding normal anatomical development and the congenital malformation. A cadaver lab with dissection focuses attention on spatial relationships, anatomic variation, embryological origin, and relationships of organ systems.  (3 unit lecture, 2 unit lab)

PA 602 Physiology and Mechanisms of Disease I (3 units)

The first course in a two part series, this course introduces students to fundamental physiological principles which apply to the human body. The integrated functioning mechanisms of the body will be presented in detail with special emphasis on the cardiovascular, respiratory, and central nervous systems. Clinical case presentations are presented to enable students to understand the pathophysiology of major diseases of each organ system.

PA 603 Microbiology and Infectious Disease (3 units)

This course will provide the student with advanced microbiology, virology, and immunology to understand the complexities of infectious disease. Emphasis will be placed on clinically relevant pathogens, isolation and aseptic techniques, identification, and treatment.

PA 604 Physiology and Mechanisms of Disease II (3 units)

The second part of a two course series, this course introduces students to fundamental physiological principles which apply to the human body. The integrated functioning mechanisms of the body will be presented in detail with special emphasis on the renal, gastrointestinal, and endocrine systems. Clinical case presentations are presented to enable students to understand the pathophysiology of major diseases of each organ system.

PA 605 Clinical Simulation Lab (1 unit)

This one unit lab will incorporate clinical simulation experiences from the medicine specialty courses taught in the final didactic semester, including OB/GYN, emergency medicine and pediatrics.

PA 606 Summative Evaluation (3 units)

This required course is the PA Program summative evaluation of each student within the final four months of the program to verify that each student is prepared to enter clinical practice.  The course includes assessments of medical knowledge, communication skills and teamwork, patient-centered care, professional development and evidence-based practice.  The course will be open for the duration of the clinical year for formative assessments and professional presentations; summative assessments will occur within the final semester of the program and include a week of summative evaluation prior to graduation.

PA 607 Pre-Clinical Preparation (3 units)

This course will incorporate disciplinespecific didactic and skills training during an intensive clinical preparatory period prior to the start of clinical rotations. Topics covered include blood borne pathogens, patient privacy, BLS certification, health maintenance, and discipline-specific didactic and skills review sessions. Students will participate in a formative OSCE.

PA 608 Pharmacology I (3 units)

This is the first in a series of two courses which focuses on pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and pharmacotherapeutic concepts in the major drug classifications. Problem-solving is emphasized through case studies designed to highlight proper drug selection, interactions, physiological implications, and administration.

PA 609 Pharmacology II (3 units)

The second semester of a two course series which focuses on the clinical application of pharmacotherapeutics, drug interactions and contraindications. Problem solving continues through the introduction of case studies designed to integrate knowledge and application.

PA 615/615L Physical Diagnosis (4 units)

This course focuses on the knowledge and skills necessary to perform a complete physical examination (including special maneuvers), integrate the findings into a diagnosis and document physical exam findings. Competence in examining the pediatric, geriatric, and obstetric patient will be expected in addition to adults.

PA 617 Interpersonal/Interprofessional Communication (2 units)

Personal and professional effectiveness training and communication skills building; includes role of the health professional as a team member, patient interviewing skills, patient/provider relationships, cultural diversity, sexuality, values, and coping skills. This course also provides instruction in elicitation of a medical history.

PA 620 Medicine I (4 units)

This is the first of a two-semester course, divided into systemic units, which focuses on the identification and treatment of medical conditions, syndromes, and diseases encountered in the integumentary, respiratory, cardiovascular, endocrine, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, neurological, musculoskeletal, renal, biliary, and hematopoietic systems. A case-based approach is used to familiarize the physician assistant student with the variety of presentations seen and the treatment options available.

PA 621 Medicine II (4 units)

This is the second of a two-semester course, divided into systemic units, which focuses on the identification and treatment of medical conditions, syndromes and diseases encountered in the integumentary, respiratory, cardiovascular, endocrine, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, neurological, musculoskeletal, renal, biliary and hematopoietic systems. A case-based approach is used to familiarize the physician assistant student with the variety of presentations seen and the treatment options available.

PA 622 Pediatrics (3 units)

This course uses a case-based learning format to aid students in understanding the physical and psycho-social fundamentals of normal growth and development, anticipatory guidance, immunizations and health maintenance. In addition, it focuses on the presentation of major pediatric disorders and conditions, their signs and symptoms, diagnosis, and management.

PA 623 Obstetrics and Gynecology (3 units)

This course provides the student with an overview of commonly encountered obstetric and gynecologic conditions in women’s health care. Major topics include pregnancy and prenatal care, menopause, lactation, uterine and breast disorders, the menstrual cycle, its hormonal regulation, and commonly encountered conditions.

PA 624 Geriatrics (2 units)

This one-semester course is designed to provide the physician assistant student with an understanding of medical issues in older adults, including changes commonly associated with aging. In addition, if focuses on the increased opportunity for undesirable drug interactions, multi-organ system failure, limitations in mobility and communication, other common impairments, and end of life care.

PA 625 The Role of the PA in General Surgery (3 units)

This one semester course presents the fundamentals of care of surgical patients. It will introduce students to the role of the PA in the surgical environment and surgical patient management. This is a practical, case based course focusing on common general surgery topics and skills needed to succeed in a surgery clinical rotation. Students will draw on the medical knowledge gained throughout didactic training and apply it in various case scenarios and simulated patient encounters. The skill set and knowledge gained will assist the transition from didactic training to becoming a productive part of a surgical inpatient team during clinical rotations.

PA 626 Emergency Medicine (3 units)

This one-semester course focuses on the identification and diagnosis of the acutely ill or injured patient. Management of conditions commonly encountered in the emergency department will be covered, as will principles of trauma resuscitation.

PA 627 Policies and Systems of US Health Care (2 units)

This course explores issues of health policy with a focus on the provision of care in various delivery systems, reimbursement policies and their effect on patient access, physician assistant practice and the economics of public and private financing.

PA 628L Diagnostic Imaging (1 unit)

Techniques of radiologic assessments will be emphasized in this laboratory course. Principles of radiologic examination will be provided with a focus on identifying normal variants and common pathologies in various diagnostic imaging modalities such as X-ray, CT, MRI, and nuclear studies.

PA 629 Clinical Skills Lab (1 unit)

This course is a one semester introduction to basic medical procedures utilized for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes in primary care, surgery, and emergency medicine practices.

PA 630 Medical Ethics and Professionalism (2 units)

This course explores medical ethics and clinical decision making, including the bioethics concepts of autonomy, beneficence/nonmaleficence, and justice. Issues around end of life, disabilities, healthcare disparity and every day ethical decision making are discussed. Professionalism, physician/PA relationships, cultural humility, and health literacy are introduced.

PA 631 Interpretation of Electrocardiograms (1 unit)

Techniques of electrocardiographic assessments will be emphasized in this laboratory course. Principles of electrocardiographic examination will be provided with a focus on electrophysiology, identifying normal variants and common pathologies on electrocardiography, and diagnosis of cardiac disease.

PA 646 Behavioral Medicine (3 units)

This course is designed to instruct the physician assistant student on factors that influence behavioral health, screening and assessment of mental health disorders, and diagnosis and interventions for the major psychiatric and mental disorders encountered in the outpatient setting. Included in the topics will be depression, anxiety, phobias, substance and eating disorders, somatic symptom disorder, psychoses,

PA 660 Integrating Seminar I (1 unit)

This three-semester, small group experience provides the student with the opportunity to apply theory gained from lectures and laboratories to problems and cases designed to integrate knowledge and skills. Three hours of seminar/discussion weekly.

PA 661 Integrating Seminar II (1 unit)

This second semester of a three-semester series is designed to integrate the knowledge obtained in the previous semesters into evaluation, clinical problem-solving, assessment, and management of commonly-encountered disorders. Three hours of seminar/discussion weekly.

PA 662 Integrating Seminar III (1 unit)

The third semester of a three-semester series is designed to integrate the knowledge obtained in the previous semesters into evaluation, clinical problem-solving, assessment, and management of commonly-encountered disorders. Three hours of seminar/discussion weekly.

PA 680L Family Medicine Clerkship (2 units)

This required clinical clerkship provides students exposure to the principles and practice of family medicine. Emphasis is placed on the management of acute, urgent and chronic conditions in pediatric, adult and geriatric populations, with a focus on disease prevention and health maintenance.  Students will identify the social, economic, and environmental factors related to caring for the patient and the extended family.  Under the guidance of a board-certified, licensed practitioner, students will participate in patient history taking, physical examination,assessment and formulation of a management plan.  Students will expand their knowledge on medical documentation and interpretation of diagnostic tests.  Students will gain experience in core competencies needed for healthcare professionals, encompassing patient- centered care, multidisciplinary/interprofessional team practice, evidence-based medicine, quality improvement, and medical informatics.

PA 681L Internal Medicine Clerkship (2 units)

This required clinical clerkship provides students exposure to the principles and practice of internal medicine. Students will integrate their knowledge of basic medical sciences and the clinical patient encounter in the inpatient and/or outpatient setting. Emphasis is placed on the medical management of acutely and chronically ill adult patients, and may include common psychiatric diagnosis such as depression and anxiety. Under the guidance of a board- certified, licensed practitioner, students will participate in patient history taking, physical examination,assessment and formulation of a management plan.  Students will expand their knowledge on medical documentation and interpretation of diagnostic tests.  Students will gain experience in core competencies needed for healthcare professionals, encompassing patient- centered care, multidisciplinary/interprofessional team practice, evidence-based medicine, quality improvement, and medical informatics.

PA 682L Surgery Clerkship (2 units)

This required clinical clerkship provides students exposure to the principles and practice of general surgery. Surgical clerkships can be completed in a variety of settings, including but not limited to major academic hospitals, community hospitals, outpatient surgical centers, and private practices. Emphasis is placed on the medical and surgical management of acute, emergent and chronic surgical conditions in adult patient populations. Under the guidance of a board-certified, licensed practitioner students will participate in pre- operative evaluation including history taking, physical examination, assessment, formulation of a diagnosis and treatment plan, interpretation of diagnostic tests, and medical documentation. Students will assist in the operating room, manage postoperative patients, and provide discharge instructions to post-surgical patients. Students will develop interviewing and counseling skills specific to the surgical setting. Students will learn how to function as part of a surgical team,including patient rounds and patient presentations to clinical team members. Students will gain experience in core competencies needed for healthcare professionals, encompassing patient-centered care, multidisciplinary/interprofessional team practice, evidence-based medicine, quality improvement, and medical informatics.

PA 683L Pediatric Clerkship (2 units)

This required clinical clerkship provides students exposure to the principles and practice of pediatric medicine in the ambulatory setting. Emphasis is placed on the management of pediatric patients from infancy to adolescence. Students will gain experience with well-child examinations, recognizing milestone development, providing parental education and anticipatory guidance, and counseling patients/guardians/caregivers on illness/injury/accident prevention. Students will develop interviewing and counseling skills specific to pediatric medicine. Students will further their knowledge on identifying and treating illnesses common to the pediatric population. Under the guidance of a board-certified, licensed practitioner, students will participate in patient history taking, physical examination, assessment and formulation of a treatment plan. Students will develop an increased understanding of the psychological factors related to the pediatric patient, including ADHD, hyperactivity disorder, depression, anxiety, and eating disorders. Students will expand their knowledge on medical documentation and interpretation of diagnostic tests. Students will gain experience in core competencies needed for healthcare professionals, encompassing patient-centered care, multidisciplinary/interprofessional team practice, evidence-based medicine, quality improvement, and medical informatics.

PA 684L Geriatric Clerkship (2 units. 1unit starting SP22)

This required clinical clerkship provides students exposure to the principles and practice of geriatric medicine. Students will integrate their knowledge of basic medical sciences and the clinical patient encounter in the geriatric setting. Students will develop interviewing and counseling skills specific to geriatric health. Students will develop an increased understanding of the social, economic, and psychological factors related to the aging patient, including complicated bereavement, delirium, and dementia. Under the guidance of a board- certified, licensed practitioner, students will participate in patient history taking, physical examination, assessment and formulation of a treatment plan. Students will expand their knowledge on medical documentation and interpretation of diagnostic tests. Students will gain experience in core competencies needed for healthcare professionals, encompassing patient-centered care, multidisciplinary/interprofessional team practice, evidence-based medicine, quality improvement, and medical informatics.

PA 685L Obstetrics and Gynecology Clerkship (2 units)

This required clinical clerkship provides students exposure to the principles and practice of obstetrics and gynecology with an emphasis on health maintenance and health screening. Emphasis is placed on caring for the female patient across the life span including menarche, family planning, childbearing years, and menopause. Students will develop interviewing and counseling skills specific to women’s health. Students will learn how to identify and treat common ambulatory gynecological issues such as sexually transmitted diseases, abnormal menstruation, and contraception. Under the guidance of a board-certified, licensed practitioner, students will participate in patient history taking, physical examination, assessment and formulation of a treatment plan. Students will develop an increased understanding of psychological factors related to the female patient, including premenstrual syndrome, mood disorders, infertility and postpartum depression. Students will expand their knowledge on medical documentation and interpretation of diagnostic tests. Students will gain experience in core competencies needed for healthcare professionals, encompassing patient-centered care, multidisciplinary/interprofessional team practice, evidence-based medicine, quality improvement, and medical informatics.

PA 686L Emergency Medicine Clerkship (2 units)

This required clinical clerkship provides students exposure to the principles and practice of emergency medicine. Emphasis is placed on the management of patients who present with urgent and emergent health care needs. Under the guidance of a board-certified, licensed practitioner students will participate in the assessment of patient acuity, emergency department procedures, consultation with specialty care and hospital admission. Students will participate in history taking, physical examination, assessment, formulation of diagnosis and treatment plans. Students will develop interviewing and counseling skills specific to the emergency room setting. Students will develop an increased understanding of the more common psychological complaints seen in the emergency department including schizophrenia, major depression, anxiety, suicidal ideations, substance-abuse disorders and 5150 psychiatric holds. Students will learn how to function as part of a multidisciplinary/interprofessional emergency medicine team. Students will expand their knowledge of medical documentation and interpretation of diagnostic tests. Students will gain experience in core competencies needed for healthcare professionals, encompassing patient-centered care, multidisciplinary/interprofessional team practice, evidence-based medicine, quality improvement, and medical informatics.

PA 687L Elective Clerkship I (2 units)

This elective clinical experience provides students exposure to the principles and practice of a medical specialty of their choice. Students will gain experience in core competencies needed for healthcare professionals, encompassing patient- centered care, multidisciplinary/interprofessional team practice, evidence-based medicine, quality improvement, and medical informatics.

PA 688L Elective Clerkship II (2 units)

This elective experience provides students exposure to the principles and practice of various aspects of medical practice in a non- clinical setting. Students will complete assigned learning modules in collaboration with their Assistant Clinical Coordinator.

PA 689L Behavioral Medicine Clerkship (1 unit)

This required clinical experience provides students exposure to the principles and practice of behavioral and mental health care under the guidance of a board-certified, licensed practitioner. Emphasis is placed on recognizing psychiatric health care needs and incorporating behavioral and mental health conditions into primary and specialty care practice. Students will develop an increased understanding of the more common psychological complaints seen in various settings including major depression, anxiety, suicidal ideations, substance-abuse disorders and 5150 psychiatric holds. Students will learn how to function as part of a multidisciplinary/interprofessional team. Students will gain experience in core competencies needed for healthcare professionals, encompassing patient-centered care, multidisciplinary/interprofessional team practice, evidence-based medicine, quality improvement, and medical informatics.

PA 690 Introduction to Evidence Based Practice (2 units)

This course introduces students to evidence based medical practice, including the philosophy and principles of scientific methods of inquiry. Topics include library resources, conducting a search for medical literature, interpretation and critical evaluation of medical literature; CITI training modules including IRB training and human subjects’ research. Students will evaluate current literature from the medical journals considering research design and data collection. Students will demonstrate an understanding of statistical methodologies and apply them to their critical appraisal of the medical literature. Through discussion, students will expand their knowledge and appreciation of evidence-based practice and its limitations.

PM 701/PM 710 Human Anatomy I & II (7 units)

These courses, offered over two semesters, provide an opportunity for students to learn about human gross and developmental anatomy. The human body will be the key source of information, and dissection and observation of the gross structure of the human cadaver will be an important activity. Lectures on the development of the various body systems will be closely correlated with the gross dissection of these systems (see Human Anatomy below) allowing students to gain an understanding of common congenital anomalies and how the adult form develops. Lectures, conferences, demonstrations and textbook assignments will be used to present anatomical information that has both practical and clinical importance and to supplement and reinforce the knowledge gained through dissection. The study of the human body is approached by regions and includes the upper extremity, thorax, abdomen, pelvis-perineum, back, head and neck. Course content emphasizes the relationship of structures to one another, the importance of these relationships for normal function, and their clinical relevance.

PM 703 Medical Genetics (1 unit)

This one unit course will emphasize medical genetics and genetic diseases. Gene expression influences all aspects of a person’s health. As our understanding of the human genome increases, the use of genetic information for diagnosis, prevention and treatment of diseases is becoming an important tool in clinical medicine. The topics to be covered in the one unit course include: genome organization and gene regulation, genetic variation, population genetics and inheritance, cytogenetics and molecular genetics, biochemical genetics and cancer genetics and specific genetic diseases that relate to each of these topics.

PM 705/PM 711 Biochemistry I & II (6 units)

A two course sequence, Biochemistry encompasses the general principles of human biochemistry. Focusing on the chemical process which occurs in all living systems, biochemistry provides the necessary biochemical knowledge for those in the medical profession. The course adopts a “whole-body” approach to the study of modern biochemistry and takes into account the rapidly expanding corpus of knowledge in this area. Emphasis is on the normal metabolic activities of living cells and their relation to selected disease states. An introduction to several biochemical techniques (experimental and practical) employed in the diagnosis and treatment of disease is provided. Upon completion of the course, students are expected to apply biochemical principles to describe and treat metabolic disorders based on clinical findings.

PM 706 Histology (4 units)

Histology includes lectures, small group work, and case studies. The course presents normal histology and correlates physiological function with cellular structure and tissue organization. Basic elements of cell biology and systems physiology are correlated with the microscopic and ultrastructural anatomy of specific cells, tissues and organs. Ultimately, histology prepares the student to apply knowledge of normal structure to disease processes and pathological conditions that are either structure or function and to understand the sub-cellular structures involved in pharmacological processes. Lectures and small group work using diagrams and micrographs of sectioned material of healthy normal cells, tissues, and organs of the body. Functional aspects of the structures are stressed in lecture. Small group work emphasis is on identification of sectioned material at the light microscope level, with some incorporation of specialized cellular components at the ultra-structural level. This course enables students to visualize normal microscopic structure and function when confronted with pathological conditions.

PM 709 Lower Extremity Anatomy I (4.5 units)

This course presents detailed osteology and arthrology of the lower extremity, involving both lecture and laboratory sessions. Lecture material is supplemented with learner centered activities, including case method teaching and simulation. The laboratory portion emphasizes detailed examination of osteological features of the lower limb including cross-sections and radiographs. Upon successful completion of Lower Extremity Anatomy I, the student is prepared to advance to Lower Extremity Anatomy II.

PM 707/PM 712 Physiology I and Physiology II (6 units)

Present day podiatric medical practice depends on a broad knowledge of physiological systems and mechanisms. The physiology course provides a solid foundation in human physiology in preparation for subsequent clinical training and prepares students for assessing pathophysiology as it arises in podiatric medicine. Basic physiological concepts such as homeostasis, membrane transport and membrane potential are addressed and these concepts are applied to each of the major physiological systems. The two physiology courses combine several approaches to explore physiology, including PowerPoint lecture presentations and animations of physiological mechanisms.

PM 714/PM 717 Medical Microbiology and Immunology (7 units)

Medical Microbiology and Immunology is the study of host-parasite relationships, with particular emphasis on humans as the host, and on the parasites that cause infections and diseases in humans. These two second year summer semester courses are divided into six general subject areas: general bacteriology, medical mycology, medical virology, medical parasitology, and immunology. Students are required to perform laboratory exercises as part of the Medical Microbiology course. The laboratory exercises emphasize basic laboratory techniques used for the isolation and identification of the most common bacteria and fungi encountered in podiatric practice. After completion of these two courses, the student will be able to identify the normal microbial flora of the human body and to recognize true pathogens, opportunistic pathogens, and non-pathogens. The student will also be able to identify the different immune processes used by healthy humans to prevent infections by pathogens.

PM 715/PM 718 Pathology I & II (6 units)

Pathology is the study of the structural and functional changes in tissues and organs of the body as a result of disease. This two-semester lecture course begins with the fundamental concepts of pathology including topics such as reaction to injury, regeneration, repair mechanisms, inflammation and neoplasia. Following this introductory material, a systematic approach to each organ system is adopted that covers both neoplastic and non-neoplastic disorders. Special emphasis is given to the diseases of the musculoskeletal system. This basis is then expanded to investigation of diseases of each organ system with emphasis on the pathology of the lower leg and foot.

PM 716/PM 719 Pharmacology I & II (8 units)

Pharmacology I is the study of drugs, how they work, and how they affect the human body. The course is taught over two semesters and is presented as a systematic investigation into pharmacological agents used in medicine based on drug group classification. During the summer semester, the course centers on a variety of basic pharmacological principles, as well as the study of certain therapeutic drug classes. Basic principles include: drug agonism and antagonism, drug-receptor bonds, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Topics for the spring semester include antimicrobials, drugs affecting endocrine function, gastrointestinal agents, respiratory agents, botanicals, drugs affecting joint and connective tissue, hematopoietic agents, and neoplastic agents. For all of the drugs learned, students are expected to recognize the agent’s primary mechanism of action, potential for drug-drug or drug-disease interactions, major side effects, and use in a clinical setting. Clinical pharmacists who specialize in the topic area on which they lecture primarily teach the course. Lectures draw from personal experience, and often relay patient vignettes to students, based on actual clinical cases. This allows students to learn both the pharmacology of the agents as well as how they are used in clinical practice. Special emphasis is given to those agents, which are widely used in the practice of podiatric medicine.

PM 722 Lower Extremity Anatomy II (4.5 units)

Continuing where Lower Extremity Anatomy I ends, this course presents the soft tissue anatomy (myology, neurology, and angiology) of the lower extremity, involving both lecture and laboratory sessions. Lecture material is supplemented with learner centered activities, including case method teaching and simulation. The laboratory portion emphasizes detailed donor body dissection, but also includes demonstration of prosected specimens, three-dimensional models, radiographs, cross-sections, and other special preparations of the lower limb. A small number of students are assigned to each cadaver so that each student can gain experience in the use of instruments and in dissection technique. Upon successful completion of Lower Extremity Anatomy II, the student is prepared to advance to studies in podiatric medicine and surgery, equipped with the necessary morphological knowledge of the lower limb. Prerequisite: PM 709

PM 724 Introduction to Evidence Based Medicine (1 unit)

An introduction to Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) and the use of the medical literature in order to find the best available evidence to answer clinical questions.

PM 727 Integrated Cell and Tissue Biology: Structure and Function (2 unit)

This is a one semester 2.0 unit course that presents basic principles of histology and integrates them into a clinical framework. Clinical correlations and case studies are embedded throughout the semester to encourage integration of the foundations of cell biology and structure into clinical decision making.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS - CLINICAL SCIENCES

PM 725 1 st Year Clinical Skills Rotation (.025 unit)

This first year rotation introduces students to the clinical experiences in the podiatric medicine program. The clinical experience knowledge and skills will include patient interview, case presentation, charting, injection, and cultural competence/patient equity and inclusion.

PM 726 Clinical Integration Module II (2 units)

This is a one semester 2.0 unit course, focused on integrating basic science and clinical studies to prepare students for the APMLE Boards Part I exam and 3rd year clinical rotations.

PM 732/PM 734/PM 738/PM 743 General Medicine I, II, III, & IV (8 units)

The didactic medicine curriculum is four semesters, starting with cardiovascular medicine in the fall of the first year, followed by dermatology, neurology and principles of internal medicine. The medicine curriculum includes physiology, physical diagnosis, emergency medicine and medical ethics. Upon completion of the general medicine curriculum, students will have a thorough understanding of the diagnosis and management of medical illness.

PM 744 Clinical Neuroscience and Neurology (6 units)

This medical neuroscience and neurology course will provide a thorough understanding of the human nervous system. This course covers topic areas, including neuroanatomy, neurohistology, neurophysiology, neurochemistry, neuroembryology, sensory systems and pathways, motor systems and pathways, clinical identification of specific neurological disorders and diseases, neuroanatomical identification of nervous system lesions, and neurological diseases and their clinical implications.

PM 745 The Science of Health Systems: Basic Principles (1 unit)

This is a one semester 1.0 unit course that presents the basic principles of Health System Science.  The course will expand on a number of foundational domains including professionalism, health care delivery, social determinants of health, population health, leadership and team-based care.

PM 750 Podiatric Medicine I (1 unit)

This introductory podiatric medicine course focuses on the common clinical foot conditions that are treated by practicing podiatric physicians. The course covers the etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of common clinical pathology, including hyperkeratosis, intermetatarsal neuroma, gout, plantar fasciitis, verrucae, onychomycosis, and cold injury.

PM 753 Podiatric Medicine II (2 units)

This course focuses on diabetic wounds and peripheral arterial disease, two conditions that are abundant in any podiatric practice. Topics covered include wound pathogenesis, diagnosis, classification and management as well as several lectures on the diagnosis and management of peripheral arterial disease.

PM 752 Introduction to Clinical Medicine (2 units)

Taught in the spring of the first year, Introduction to Clinical Medicine is designed to help students with the transition from learning in a classroom to learning in a clinical setting. This course covers introductory techniques in obtaining a patient history, formulating a diagnosis, learning to present patients, and performing fundamental podiatric treatment. By the end of this course, students should be better prepared to start the second year clinical rotations.

PM 751 Radiology I (1 unit)

This second year summer semester course introduces students to the principles of radiography, with an emphasis on radiation safety, technique and the material required to pass the California radiological licensing examination (which is typically taken upon completion of residency). Radiology I also introduces advanced imaging modalities such as MRI, CT and diagnostic ultrasound. Upon successful completion of Radiology I, students will be better prepared for Radiology II and for clinical radiology rotations.

PM 754 Radiology II (1 unit)

In this second year spring semester course, students will learn to recognize key radiographic findings and link those findings to diseases that affect the lower extremity. Upon completing Radiology II, students will be better prepared to interpret foot and ankle radiographs during clinical rotations.

PM 736/PM 739 Dermatology I & II (3 units)

This two-semester course provides an integrated approach to dermatologic diagnosis and therapy. Particular emphasis is given to history-taking pertinent to the patient with a dermatological problem, techniques of physical examination, and relevant diagnostic laboratory procedures. The courses are designed to teach an effective biomedical and clinical approach to patients with dermatological disease throughout the body, including the lower extremities.

PM 737 Pediatrics (2 units)

This one-semester third year course introduces students to clinical pediatrics. The course covers the history and physical relevant to the pediatric patient and includes lectures on child development, pediatric orthopedics, pediatric infections and pediatric oncology.

PM 755 Jurisprudence (1 unit)

This third year course is taught by the attorney for the California Podiatric Medical Association. The course exposes students to the legal aspects of the podiatric medical profession.

PM 758 Public Health (1 unit)

This course is dedicated to public health and exposes students to epidemiology and medical statistics. In addition, research design and interpretation are emphasized.

PM 770 Biomechanics I (1.75 units)

A first year second semester series of lectures and demonstrations designed to provide a basic understanding of the terminology and concepts of mechanical function of the lower extremity as well as normal development and dysfunction of the musculoskeletal system. An educational model of the foot will be defined creating a standard, which does not exist in nature, but can be used as a reference to quantify function and structure.

PM 771 Biomechanics II  (2 units)

A series of lectures designed to aid students in the application of the concepts taught in Biomechanics I. Specific foot types, as well as some of the more common pathologies are addressed. Topics include the pediatric foot, normal growth and pathology. The biomechanical evaluation, gait analysis and orthotic principles, construction and design will be included to correlate with the skills workshop. Emphasis is placed on identifying foot abnormalities, pathologies and dysfunction.

PM 772 Biomechanics III (2 units)

A series of lectures designed to aid third-year students in applying the concepts and principles of lower extremity biomechanics to treatment modalities. Specific foot types and pathologies that were identified in Biomechanics I and II will be reviewed with emphasis on treatment. Concepts related to the mechanism of pathology will be presented specifically relating to the podiatric patient, gait disturbances, orthotic prescription writing and shoe therapy. 

PM 790 Podiatric Surgery I (2 units)

Podiatric Surgery I is an introductory course offered in the fall semester of the second year, which provides lectures on surgical principles, fixation techniques, evaluation and surgical management of infections, nail pathology and soft tissue lesions, laboratories, suturing and other skills. Upon completion of the course the student will be able to apply surgical principles in the diagnosis and treatment of infections, nail and soft tissue pathology as well as being familiar with the various types of fixation techniques.

PM 791 Podiatric Surgery II (2 units)

This course introduces second year podiatric medical students to the pathomechanics and surgical treatment for digital, lesser metatarsal, and 1 st ray pathology. Students also receive workshops on fabrication and use of preoperative templates. At the conclusion of this course, students will have a basic understanding of how to evaluate and manage common forefoot pathologies.

PM 792 Podiatric Surgery III (2 units)

Building upon the surgical principles presented in Podiatric Surgery I and II, this advanced surgery course instructs students in reconstructive surgical techniques and procedures of the rearfoot and ankle. The course includes a discussion of the underlying causes of rearfoot and ankle pathology as well as the surgical approaches used to manage these conditions.

PM 793 Podiatric Trauma (2 units)

This surgery course instructs students in the medical and surgical management of the patient who has suffered lower extremity trauma. Students are first instructed on the basic principles of trauma management followed by instruction on applying these principles to specific foot and ankle injuries. Although the instruction describes both direct and indirect trauma, the emphasis is on indirect trauma, which represents the majority of lower extremity injuries. The majority of trauma situations of the lower extremity are the result of indirect mechanisms, and it is the understanding of these mechanisms that are tantamount to the successful treatment of these injuries. The course presentations are in PowerPoint with intraoperative photographic slides that illustrate the actual surgeries and compare the preoperative and postoperative clinical and radiographic appearance of the foot and ankle. Upon completion of the four podiatric surgery courses, students will have the necessary didactic knowledge to begin their residency training.

CLINICAL ROTATIONS DESCRIPTIONS

PM 756 Second Year Highland Hospital Rotation (1 unit)

This one-month second-year rotation provides an opportunity for students to evaluate and treat a variety of patients and pathologies in a busy urban podiatric medicine clinic. In addition to performing palliative care, students will participate in wound care, trauma, and sports medicine.

PM 764 Third Year Highland Rotation – Mondays (.5 unit)

This rotation supplements the two-month third year Highland rotation, providing additional time in a busy county clinic. This rotation may be taken before or after the two-month rotation. Patient pathology in this outpatient clinic typically includes neuropathic ulceration, lower extremity musculoskeletal problems, trauma, foot deformity and you will also provide general podiatric care.

PM 789 Second Year Laguna Honda Hospital Rotation (.5 unit)

This one-month rotation for second year students meets for 8 hours each week. At Laguna Honda Hospital, one of the nation’s largest municipally operated nursing facilities, students gain familiarity with the diseases and conditions commonly seen in a geriatric population. Students learn to diagnose and treat foot problems while improving their foot care skills.

PM 788 Second Year Homeless Clinic Rotation (.5 unit)

Second year students participate in this one-month Homeless Clinic rotation, which provides podiatric medical care at several clinics for homeless residents of San Francisco. This rotation, which is done in collaboration with the City and County of San Francisco, gives students an opportunity to evaluate patients and render podiatric medical services to individuals who do not have access to foot care. The Homeless Clinics operate two evenings per week. First year students also have an opportunity to visit these clinics to observe as well as participate in patient care.

PM 782 Second Year Clinical Skills Rotation (1 unit)

This second year clinical skills rotation is a four week rotation that uses a variety of learning techniques from a multi-disciplinary faculty in a small group setting. Each week students will learn different clinical skills, which will help solidify fundamental patient evaluation skills. Students will develop an increased level of awareness of medical ethics, medical errors and communication with patients of different ethnicities and cultural backgrounds. During the rotation, students will also gain basic expertise in suturing, interpretation of clinical labs, EKGs, and chest films.

PM 735 Second Year Radiology Rotation (1 unit)

In this three-month rotation, students spend four hours each week in a small group setting interpreting normal plain film radiographs, normal MRI studies and ultrasounds of the foot and ankle under direct supervision of an attending podiatrist. Upon completion of this rotation, the student will be prepared to begin their third year radiology rotation (DPM 762).

PM 781 Second Year Simulation Center Rotation (.5 unit)

The second year Simulation Center Rotation, taught within the Health Sciences Simulation Center (HSSC) facility, is a 4 week course that uses a variety of simulation-based learning techniques in a small group setting. Topics covered include patient evaluation, medical emergencies, operating room protocol, and interdisciplinary collaboration. By the end of this rotation students should have increased confidence working in an operating room environment, increased confidence interacting with patients and other health care professionals and should have more confidence when starting their third-year clinical rotations.

PM 733 Second Year Medicine Rotation (.5 unit)

This rotation is designed to prepare podiatric medical students for general medicine and emergency medicine clinics. Students are taught how to perform a complete history and physical. This rotation takes place in a state of the art physical diagnosis laboratory. After completion of this rotation, students are able to perform a full history and physical exam and develop a differential diagnosis.

PM 773 Second Year Biomechanics Workshop (1 unit)

A series of seven 8-hour workshops and demonstrations designed to develop the necessary skills that will allow students to apply the concepts of lower extremity biomechanics to orthotic therapy. Students will perform arthrometric examinations, under faculty supervision, as well as participate in gait evaluations. Students will be required to develop the skills necessary to take an accurate non-weight bearing and semi-weight bearing negative cast. Included in this course are two sessions at a professional orthotic laboratory where the student will participate in the various stages of production of their own functional orthotic. Included are workshops on orthotic prescription writing, orthotic evaluation and orthotic troubleshooting.

GENED 748 Neuromechanical Bases of Posture, Balance, and Gait (2 units)

Students in this course will investigate the neurological, biomechanical, and motor control aspects of three fundamental human movement skills: posture, balance, and gait. Emphasis will be placed on understanding how sensorimotor integration occurs in healthy individuals during these tasks, and how dysfunctions typically manifest themselves. Students will spend the majority of class time in hands-on sessions in the Motion Analysis Research Center working in interdisciplinary teams to learn how to apply research tools and techniques to answer clinical questions related to posture, balance, and gait. In addition, students will be encouraged to explore ways to translate what they learn in this course to real-life, clinic-based situations. Prerequisites: PM 770

PM 760 Third-Year Highland General Hospital Rotation (2.5 units)

This two-month third-year rotation provides an advanced opportunity for students to evaluate and treat a variety of patients and pathologies in a busy urban podiatric medicine clinic. During this rotation, students will also spend two half-days each week in the third-year radiology rotation (PM-762).

PM 762 Third Year Radiology Rotation (1 unit)

During this two-month, small-group rotation, students will become more proficient at reading, identifying, and interpreting foot and ankle pathology on plain film radiographs, MRIs, CT scans and diagnostic ultrasound images.

PM 794 Third Year Biomechanics and Sports Medicine Rotation (2 units)

This one-month, third year clinical rotation focuses on treating patients with lower extremity pathology that is mechanical in origin. The overall goal is to improve student proficiency in gait analysis, musculoskeletal evaluation of the foot and ankle and treatment using orthotic devices. In addition, this rotation is designed to capture the excitement and challenges presented in treating sports medicine related injuries. Emphasis will be placed on clinical recognition, detection, and conservative treatment so that the athlete can safely return to their sport as soon as possible. Upon completion of this rotation, students will be better prepared for their 4 th year clerkships.

PM 759 Third Year Diabetic Wound Care Rotation (4 units)

Presented as a two-month rotation in the third year, students will see patients in several wound care clinical settings. Students learn and use the most appropriate and up-to-date evaluation and treatment modalities for a patient population at high risk for amputation. There is an emphasis on student initiative in increasing their knowledge base by outside readings, journal club, and student presentations.

PM 741 Third Year Medicine Rotation (3 units)

The third year Medicine rotation, taught within the Health Sciences Simulation Center (HSSC) facility, is a 4 week course (16 sessions) that uses a variety of simulation-based learning techniques in a small group setting. Each session covers different clinical scenarios, which use simulated patients (both actors and manikins) followed by small-group debriefing. Task simulators are also used to gain proficiency in fundamental medical procedures.

PM 761 Third Year Private Office Clerkship (2 units)

During this one-month assignment students experience the full scope of a private office, i.e. palliation, biomechanics, office surgery and hospital surgery. Students also gain an understanding of patient flow in a private office and the importance of good relationships between a private practitioner and patients. The private office clerkship helps students appreciate the complexities of the business operations of a private practice.

PM 795 Clinical Integration Module III (1.0 unit)

This one semester course focuses on reviewing and integrating information and clinical experiences from the previous three years of the program. The students will also focus on preparing for the Boards Part II examination by attending review sessions and taking practice
examinations. The course will also cover interview skills and provide opportunities for mock residency interviews.

PM 796 Third Year Surgery Rotation (7.5 units)

This three month 3 rd year student rotation is held at St. Mary’s Medical Center in San Francisco. During the 3 months students function in the operating room scrubbing on podiatric, vascular and general surgery cases as well as working with residents and faculty in the management of patients on an outpatient and inpatient basis. When not in the operating room, the students will function in a private office setting learning how to properly evaluate patients preoperatively and postoperatively as well as providing regular podiatric care.

PM 799 (48 units)

During the fourth year, students have the opportunity to base their clinical training at one of several affiliated medical centers. These include: CSPM Core, VA Albuquerque Medical Center, Arizona Maricopa Medical Center, VA Salt Lake City Utah Medical Center, VA Puget Sound Medical Center, and Long Beach Memorial Medical Center. Students receive 4 units of credit for each month they complete a rotation or clerkship assignment. A minimum of 48 units of credit is required to complete the twelve-month fourth year curriculum.

PH 601 Principles of Epidemiology as Demonstrated by Pandemics (3 Units)

An overview of the nature and scope of epidemiology in the healthcare and community settings is presented by focusing on current and emerging infectious diseases. The COVID19 pandemic is used as a model to explore topics in Epidemiology. Topics include applying basic epidemiological concepts and principles in selected acute and chronic health problems, measures of disease frequency, and different epidemiological methods. This course will allow students to identify health and disease etiology factors, including biological, behavioral, sociocultural, and environmental factors. Students will develop skills and knowledge to recognize, interpret, and evaluate published epidemiologic studies.